Protecting the Yottabyte archive

blinkenlights by habi (cc) (from flickr)
blinkenlights by habi (cc) (from flickr)

In a previous post I discussed what it would take to store 1YB of data in 2015 for the National Security Agency (NSA). Due to length, that post did not discuss many other aspects of the 1YB archive such as ingest, index, data protection, etc. Thus, I will attempt to cover each of these in turn and as such, this post will cover some of the data protection aspects of the 1YB archive and its catalog/index.

RAID protecting 1YB of data

Protecting the 1YB archive will require some sort of parity protection. RAID data protection could certainly be used and may need to be extended to removable media (RAID for tape), but that would require somewhere in the neighborhood of 10-20% additional storage (RAID5 across 10 to 5 tape drives). It’s possible with Reed-Solomon encoding and using RAID6 that we could take this down to 5-10% of additional storage (RAID 6 for a 40 to a 20 wide tape drive stripe). Possibly other forms of ECC (such as turbo codes) might be usable in a RAID like configuration which would give even better reliability with less additional storage.

But RAID like protection also applies to the data catalog and indexes required to access the 1YB archive of data. Ditto for the online data itself while it’s being ingested, indexed, or readback. For the remainder of this post I ignore the RAID overhead but suffice it to say with today’s an additional 10% storage for parity will not change this discussion much.

Also in the original post I envisioned a multi-tier storage hierarchy but the lowest tier always held a copy of any files residing in the upper tiers. This would provide some RAID1 like redundancy for any online data. This might be pretty usefull, i.e., if a file is of high interest, it could have been accessed recently and therefore resides in upper storage tiers. As such, multiple copies of interesting files could exist.

Catalog and indexes backups for 1YB archive

IMHO, RAID or other parity protection is different than data backup. Data backup is generally used as a last line of defense for hardware failure, software failure or user error (deleting the wrong data). It’s certainly possible that the lowest tier data is stored on some sort of WORM (write once read many times) media meaning it cannot be overwritten, eliminating one class of user error.

But this presumes the catalog is available and the media is locatable. Which means the catalog has to be preserved/protected from user error, HW and SW failures. I wrote about whether cloud storage needs backup in a prior post and feel strongly that the 1YB archive would also require backups as well.

In general, backup today is done by copying the data to some other storage and keeping that storage offsite from the original data center. At this amount of data, most likely the 2.1×10**21 of catalog (see original post) and index data would be copied to some form of removable media. The catalog is most important as the other two indexes could potentially be rebuilt from the catalog and original data. Assuming we are unwilling to reindex the data, with LTO-6 tape cartridges, the catalog and index backups would take 1.3×10**9 LTO-6 cartridges (at 1.6×10**12 bytes/cartridge).

To back up this amount of data once per month would take a gaggle of tape drives. There are ~2.6×10**6 seconds/month and each LTO-6 drive can transfer 5.4×10**8 bytes/sec or 1.4X10**15 bytes/drive-month but we need to backup 2.1×10**21 bytes of data so we need ~1.5×10**6 tape transports. Now tapes do not operate 100% of the time because when a cartridge becomes full it has to be changed out with an empty one, but this amounts to a rounding error at these numbers.

To figure out the tape robotics needed to service 1.5×10**6 transports we could use the latest T-finity tape library just announced by Spectra Logic . The T-Finity supports 500 tape drives and 122,000 tape cartridges, so we would need 3.0×10**3 libraries to handle the drive workload and about 1.1×10**4 libraries to store the cartridge set required, so 11,000 T-finity libraries would suffice. Presumably, using LTO-7 these numbers could be cut in half ~5,500 libraries, ~7.5×10**5 transports, and 6.6×10**8 cartridges.

Other removable media exist, most notably the Prostor RDX. However RDX roadmap info out to the next generation are not readily available and high-end robotics are do not currently support RDX. So for the moment tape seems the only viable removable backup for the catalog and index for the 1YB archive.

Mirroring the data

Another approach to protecting the data is to mirror the catalog and index data. This involves taking the data and copying it to another online storage repository. This doubles the storage required (to 4.2×10**21 bytes of storage). Replication doesn’t easily protect from user error but is an option worthy of consideration.

Networking infrastructure needed

Whether mirroring or backing up to tape, moving this amount of data will require substantial networking infrastructure. If we assume that in 2105 we have 32GFC (32 gb/sec fibre channel interfaces). Each interface could potentially transfer 3.2GB/s or 3.2×10**9 bytes/sec. Mirroring or backing up 2.1×10**21 bytes over one month will take ~2.5×10**6 32GFC interfaces. Probably should have twice this amount of networking just to not have any one be a bottleneck so 5×10**6 32GFC interfaces should work.

As for switches, the current Brocade DCX supports 768 8GFC ports and presumably similar port counts will be available in 2015 to support 32GFC. In addition if we assume at least 2 ports per link, we will need ~6,500 fully populated DCX switches. This doesn’t account for multi-layer switches and other sophisticated switch topologies but could be accommodated with another factor of 2 or ~13,000 switches.

Hot backups require journals

This all assumes we can do catalog and index backups once per month and take the whole month to do them. Now storage today normally has to be taken offline (via snapshot or some other mechanism) to be backed up in a consistent state. While it’s not impossible to backup data that is concurrently being updated it is more difficult. In this case, one needs to maintain a journal file of the updates going on while the data is being backed up and be able to apply the journaled changes to the data backed up.

For the moment I am not going to determine the storage requirements for the journal file required to cover the catalog transactions for a month, but this is dependent on the change rate of the catalog data. So it will necessarily be a function of the index or ingest rate of the 1YB archive to be covered in a future post.

Stay tuned, I am just having too much fun to stop.

2 Replies to “Protecting the Yottabyte archive”

  1. According to the book body of secrets the NSA uses insanely fast tape storage. They have developed an amazing catalog system to sort and monitor the catalog. In the book it stated that years if not decades ago they could store 10GB onto one square inch of roughly 2 inch wide tapes ( described as 3x bigger than a VHS tape). If that’s the case they can store staggering amounts of data with very minimal cost esp compared to hard drives which are far less stable. They even have among the biggest degaussing systems to reuse the tapes. The future is now.

    William,
    Given these numbers, it’s highly unlikely that NSA is using anything but commercially available storage for this archive. In the past VHS-like storage was available in a data storage product but all those products have gone out of production. Today the two-three tape options are LTO and the proprietary formats from IBM and Sun. And although they are fast, there would need to be a lot of them to keep up with storing and backing up the 1YB archive. Ray

  2. I forgot to mention that the book notes they utilize at least one super computer to track, sort and monitor the massive catalog.

    William,
    Yes it will take a lot of computing power to track, sort and monitor the 1YB catalog. Not sure one supercomputer is up to the task unless of course it’s composed of 1000’s of smaller computers all doing part of the job. Ray

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