HP Tech Day – StoreServ Flash Optimizations

Attended HP Tech Field Day late last month in Disneyland. Must say the venue was the best ever for HP, and getting in on Nth Generation Conference was a plus. Sorry it has taken so long for me to get around to writing about it.

We spent a day going over HP’s new converged storage, software defined storage and other storage topics. HP has segmented the Software Defined Data Center (SDDC) storage requirements into cost optimized, Software Defined Storage and SLA optimized, Service Refined Storage. Under Software Defined storage they talked about their StoreVirtual product line which is an outgrowth of the Lefthand Networks VSA, first introduced in 2007. This June, they extended SDS to include their StoreOnce VSA product to go after SMB and ROBO backup storage requirements.

We also discussed some of HP’s OpenStack integration work to integrate current HP block storage into OpenStack Cinder. They discussed some of the integrations they plan for file and object store as well.

However what I mostly want to discuss in this post is the session discussing how HP StoreServ 3PAR had optimized their storage system for flash.

They showed an SPC-1 chart depicting various storage systems IOPs levels and response times as they ramped from 10% to 100% of their IOPS rate. StoreServ 3PAR’s latest entry showed a considerable band of IOPS (25K to over 250K) all within a sub-msec response time range. Which was pretty impressive since at the time no other storage systems seemed able to do this for their whole range of IOPS. (A more recent SPC-1 result from HDS with an all-flash VSP with Hitachi Accelerated Flash also was able to accomplish this [sub-msec response time throughout their whole benchmark], only in their case it reached over 600K IOPS – read about this in our latest performance report in our newsletter, sign up above right).

  • Adaptive Read – As I understood it, this changed the size of backend reads to match the size requested by the front end. For disk systems, one often sees that a host read of say 4KB often causes a read of 16KB from the backend, with the assumption that the host will request additional data after the block read off of disk and 90% of the time spent to do a disk read is getting the head to the correct track and once there it takes almost no effort to read more data. However with flash, there is no real effort to get to a proper location to read a block of flash data and as such, there is no advantage to reading more data than the host requests, because if they come back for more one can immediately read from the flash again.
  • Adaptive Write – Similar to adaptive read, adaptive write only writes the changed data to flash. So if a host writes a 4KB block then 4KB is written to flash. This doesn’t help much for RAID 5 because of parity updates but for RAID 1 (mirroring) this saves on flash writes which ultimately lengthens flash life.
  • Adaptive Offload (destage) – This changes the frequency of destaging or flushing cache depending on the level of write activity. Slower destaging allows written (dirty) data to accumulate in cache if there’s not much write activity going on, which means in RAID 5 parity may not need to be updated as one could potentially accumulate a whole stripe’s worth of data in cache. In low-activity situations such destaging could occur every 200 msecs. whereas with high write activity destaging could occur as fast as every 3 msecs.
  • Multi-tennant IO processing – For disk drives, with sequential reads, one wants the largest stripes possible (due to head positioning penalty) but for SSDs one wants the smallest stripe sizes possible. The other problem with large stripe sizes is that devices are busy during the longer sized IO while performing the stripe writes (and reads). StoreServ modified the stripe size for SSDs to be 32KB so that other IO activity need not have to wait as long to get their turn in the (IO device) queue. The other advantage is when one is doing SSD rebuilds, with a 32KB stripe size one can intersperse more IO activity for the devices involved in the rebuild without impacting rebuild performance.

Of course the other major advantage of HP StoreServ’s 3PAR architecture provides for Flash is its intrinsic wide striping that’s done across a storage pool. This way all the SSDs can be used optimally and equally to service customer IOs.

I am certain there were other optimizations HP made to support SSDs in StoreServ storage, but these are the ones they were willing to talk publicly about.

No mention of when Memristor SSDs were going to be available but stay tuned, HP let slip that sooner or later Memristor Flash storage will be in HP storage & servers.

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Photo Credits: (c) 2013 Silverton Consulting, Inc

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