Industrial revolutions, deep learning & NVIDIA’s 3U AI super computer @ FMS 2017

I was at Flash Memory Summit this past week and besides the fire on the exhibit floor, there was a interesting keynote by Andy Steinbach, PhD from NVIDIA on “Deep Learning: Extracting Maximum Knowledge from Big Data using Big Compute”.  The title was a bit much but his session was great.

2012 the dawn of the 4th industrial revolution

Steinbach started off describing AI, machine learning and deep learning as another industrial revolution, similar to the emergence of steam engines, mass production and automation of production. All of which have changed the world for the better.

Steinbach said that AI is been gestating for 50 years now but in 2012 there was a step change in it’s capabilities.

Prior to 2012 hand coded AI image recognition algorithms were able to achieve about a 74%  image recognition level but in 2012, a deep learning algorithm achieved almost 85%, in one year.

And since then it’s been on a linear trend of improvements such that in 2015, current deep learning algorithms are better than human image recognition. Similar step function improvements were seen in speech recognition as well around 2012.

What drove the improvement?

Machine and deep learning depend on convolutional neural networks. These are layers of connected nodes. There are typically an input layer and output layer and N number of internal layers in a network. The connection weights between nodes control the response of the network.

Todays image recognition convolutional networks can have ~10 layers, billions of parameters, take ~30 Exaflops to train, using 10M images and took days to weeks to train.

Image recognition covolutional neural networks end up modeling the human visual cortex which has neurons to recognize edges and other specialized characteristics of a visual field.

The other thing that happened was that convolutional neural nets were translated to execute on GPUs in 2011. Neural networks had been around in AI since almost the very beginning but their computational complexity made them impossible to use effectively until recently. GPUs with 1000s of cores all able to double precision floating point operations made these networks now much more feasible.

Deep learning training of a network takes place through optimization of the node connections weights. This is done via a back propagation algorithm that was invented in the 1980’s.  Back propagation typically depends on “supervised learning” which adjust the weights of the connections between nodes to come closer to the correct answer, like recognizing Sarah in an image.

Deep learning today

Steinbach showed multiple examples of deep learning algorithms such as:

  • Mortgage prepayment predictor system which takes information about a mortgagee, location, and other data and predicts whether they will pre-pay their mortgage.
  • Car automation image recognition system which recognizes people, cars, lanes, road surfaces, obstacles and just about anything else in front of a car traveling a road.
  • X-ray diagnostic system that can diagnose diseases present in people from the X-ray images.

As far as I know all these algorithms use supervised learning and back propagation to train a convolutional network.

Steinbach did show an example of “un-supervised learning” which essentially was fed a bunch of images and did clustering analysis on them.  Not sure what the back propagation tried to optimize but the system was used to cluster the images in the set. It was able to identify one cluster of just military aircraft images out of the data.

The other advantage of convolutional neural networks is that they can be reused. E.g. the X-ray diagnostic system above used an image recognition neural net as a starting point and then ran it against a supervised set of X-rays with doctor provided diagnoses.

Another advantage of deep learning is that it can handle any number of dimensions. Mathematical optimization algorithms can handle a relatively few dimensions but deep learning can handle any number of dimensions.  The number of input dimensions, the number of nodes in each layer and number of layers in your network are only limited by computational power.

NVIDIA’s DGX a deep learning super computer

At the end of Stienbach’s talk he mentioned the DGX appliance designed by NVIDIA for AI research.

The appliance has 8 state of the art NVIDIA GPUs, connected over a high speed NVLink with anywhere from ~29K to ~41K cores depending on GPU selected, and is capable of 170 to 960 Flops (FP16).

Steinbach said this single 3u appliance would have been rated the number one supercomputer in 2004 beating out a building full of servers. If you were to connect 13 (I think) DGX’s together, you would qualify to be on the top 500 super computers in the world.

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Comments?

Photo credit(s): Steinbach’s “Deep Learning: Extracting Maximum Knowledge from Big Data using Big Compute” presentation at FMS 2017.

Google releases new Cloud TPU & Machine Learning supercomputer in the cloud

Last year about this time Google released their 1st generation TPU chip to the world (see my TPU and HW vs. SW … post for more info).

This year they are releasing a new version of their hardware called the Cloud TPU chip and making it available in a cluster on their Google Cloud.  Cloud TPU is in Alpha testing now. As I understand it, access to the Cloud TPU will eventually be free to researchers who promise to freely publish their research and at a price for everyone else.

What’s different between TPU v1 and Cloud TPU v2

The differences between version 1 and 2 mostly seem to be tied to training Machine Learning Models.

TPU v1 didn’t have any real ability to train machine learning (ML) models. It was a relatively dumb (8 bit ALU) chip but if you had say a ML model already created to do something like understand speech, you could load that model into the TPU v1 board and have it be executed very fast. The TPU v1 chip board was also placed on a separate PCIe board (I think), connected to normal x86 CPUs  as sort of a CPU accelerator. The advantage of TPU v1 over GPUs or normal X86 CPUs was mostly in power consumption and speed of ML model execution.

Cloud TPU v2 looks to be a standalone multi-processor device, that’s connected to others via what looks like Ethernet connections. One thing that Google seems to be highlighting is the Cloud TPU’s floating point performance. A Cloud TPU device (board) is capable of 180 TeraFlops (trillion or 10^12 floating point operations per second). A 64 Cloud TPU device pod can theoretically execute 11.5 PetaFlops (10^15 FLops).

TPU v1 had no floating point capabilities whatsoever. So Cloud TPU is intended to speed up the training part of ML models which requires extensive floating point calculations. Presumably, they have also improved the ML model execution processing in Cloud TPU vs. TPU V1 as well. More information on their Cloud TPU chips is available here.

So how do you code a TPU?

Both TPU v1 and Cloud TPU are programmed by Google’s open source TensorFlow. TensorFlow is a set of software libraries to facilitate numerical computation via data flow graph programming.

Apparently with data flow programming you have many nodes and many more connections between them. When a connection is fired between nodes it transfers a multi-dimensional matrix (tensor) to the node. I guess the node takes this multidimensional array does some (floating point) calculations on this data and then determines which of its outgoing connections to fire and how to alter the tensor to send to across those connections.

Apparently, TensorFlow works with X86 servers, GPU chips, TPU v1 or Cloud TPU. Google TensorFlow 1.2.0 is now available. Google says that TensorFlow is in use in over 6000 open source projects. TensorFlow uses Python and 1.2.0 runs on Linux, Mac, & Windows. More information on TensorFlow can be found here.

So where can I get some Cloud TPUs

Google is releasing their new Cloud TPU in the TensorFlow Research Cloud (TFRC). The TFRC has 1000 Cloud TPU devices connected together which can be used by any organization to train machine learning algorithms and execute machine learning algorithms.

I signed up (here) to be an alpha tester. During the signup process the site asked me: what hardware (GPUs, CPUs) and platforms I was currently using to training my ML models; how long does my ML model take to train; how large a training (data) set do I use (ranging from 10GB to >1PB) as well as other ML model oriented questions. I guess there trying to understand what the market requirements are outside of Google’s own use.

Google’s been using more ML and other AI technologies in many of their products and this will no doubt accelerate with the introduction of the Cloud TPU. Making it available to others is an interesting play but this would be one way to amortize the cost of creating the chip. Another way would be to sell the Cloud TPU directly to businesses, government agencies, non government agencies, etc.

I have no real idea what I am going to do with alpha access to the TFRC but I was thinking maybe I could feed it all my blog posts and train a ML model to start writing blog post for me. If anyone has any other ideas, please let me know.

Comments?

Photo credit(s): From Google’s website on the new Cloud TPU

 

IBM Research creates PCM synapses – cognitive computing, round 4

Last year we reported on IBM’s progress in taking PCM (phase change memory) and using it to create a new, neuromorphic computing architecture (see Phase Change Memory (PCM) based neuromorphic processors). And earlier we discussed IBM’s (2nd generation), True North chip and IBM’s (1st generation) Synapse Chip.

This past week IBM made another cognitive computing announcement. This time they have taken their neuromorphic technologies another step closer to precise emulation of neurological processing of the brain.

Their research paper was not directly available, but IBM Research has summarized its contents in a short web article with a video (see IBM Scientists imitate the functionality of neurons with Phase-Change device).
Continue reading “IBM Research creates PCM synapses – cognitive computing, round 4”

TPU and hardware vs. software innovation (round 3)

tpu-2At Google IO conference this week, they revealed (see Google supercharges machine learning tasks …) that they had been designing and operating their own processor chips in order to optimize machine learning.

They called the new chip, a Tensor Processing Unit (TPU). According to Google, the TPU provides an order of magnitude more power efficient machine learning over what’s achievable via off the shelf GPU/CPUs. TensorFlow is Google’s open sourced machine learning  software.

This is very interesting, as Google and the rest of the hype-scale hive seem to have latched onto open sourced software and commodity hardware for all their innovation. This has led the industry to believe that hardware customization/innovation is dead and the only thing anyone needs is software developers. I believe this is incorrect and that hardware innovation combined with software innovation is a better way, (see Commodity hardware always loses and Better storage through hardware posts).
Continue reading “TPU and hardware vs. software innovation (round 3)”

PCM based neuromorphic processors

Read an interesting article from Register the other day about  IBM’s Almadan Research lab using standard Non-volatile memory devices to implement a neural net. They apparently used 2-PCM (Phase Change Memory) devices to implement a 913 neuron/165K synapse pattern recognition system.

This seems to be another (simpler, cheaper) way to create neuromorphic chips. We’ve written about neuromorphic chips before (see my posts on IBM SyNAPSE, IBM TrueNorth and MIT’s analog neuromorphic chip). The latest TrueNorth chip from IBM uses ~5B transistors and provides 1M neurons with 256M synapses.

But none of the other research I have read actually described the neuromorphic “programming” process at the same level nor provided a “success rate” on a standard AI pattern matching benchmark as IBM has with the PCM device.

PCM based AI

The IBM summary report on the research discusses at length how the pattern recognition neural network (NN) was “trained” and how the 913 neuron/165K synapse NN was able to achieve 82% accuracy on NIST’s handwritten digit training database.

The paper has many impressive graphics. The NN was designed as a 3-layer network and used back propagation for its learning process. They show how the back propagation training was used to determine the weights.

The other interesting thing was they analyzed how hardware faults (stuck-ats, dead conductors, number of resets, etc.) and different learning parameters (stochasticity, learning batch size, variable maxima, etc.) impacted NN effectiveness on the test database.

Turns out the NN could tolerate ~30% dead conductors (in the Synapses) or 20% of stuck-at’s in the PCM memory and still generate pretty good accuracy on the training event. Not sure I understand the learning parameters but they varied batch size from 1 to 10 and this didn’t seem to impact NN accuracy whatsoever.

Which PCM was used?

In trying to understand which PCM devices were in use, the only information available said it was a 180nm device. According to a 2012 Flash Memory Summit Report report on alternative NVM technologies, 180nm PCM devices have been around since 2004, a 90nm PCM device was introduced in 2008 with 128Mb and even newer PCM devices at 45nm were introduced in 2010 with 1Gb of memory.  So I would conclude that the 180nm PCM device supported ~16 to 32Mb.

What can we do with todays PCM technology?

With the industry supporting a doubling of transistors/chip every 2 years a PCM device in 2014 should have 4X the transistors of the 45nm, 2010 device above and ~4-8X the memory. So today we should be seeing 4-16Gb PCM chips at ~22nm. Given this, current PCM technology should support 32-64X more neurons than the 180nm devices or ~29K to ~58K neurons or so

Unclear what technology was used for the  ‘synapses’  but based on the time frame for the PCM devices, this should also be able to scale up by a factor of 32-64X or between ~5.3M to ~10.6M synapses.

Still this doesn’t approach TrueNorth’s Neurons/Synapse levels, but it’s close. But then 2 4-16Gb PCMs probably don’t cost nearly as much to purchase as TrueNorth costs to create.

The programing model for the TrueNorth/Synapse chips doesn’t appear to be neural network like. So perhaps another advantage of the PCM model of hardware based AI is that you can use standard, well known NN programming methods to train and simulate it.

So, PCM based neural networks seem an easier way to create hardware based AI. Not sure this will ever match Neuron/Synapse levels that the dedicated, special purpose neuromorphic chips in development can accomplish but in the end, they both are hardware based AI that can support better pattern recognition.

Using commodity PCM devices any organization with suitable technological skills should be able to create a hardware based NN that operates much faster than any NN software simulation. And if PCM technology starts to obtain market acceptance, the funding available to advance PCMs will vastly exceed that which IBM/MIT can devote to TrueNorth and its descendants.

Now, what is HP up to with their memristor technology and The Machine?

Photo Credits: Neurons by Leandro Agrò