Zipline delivers blood 7X24 using fixed wing drones in Rwanda

Read an article the other day in MIT Tech Review (Zipline’s ambitious medical drone delivery in Africa) about a startup in Silicon Valley, Zipline, that has started delivering blood by drones to remote medical centers in Rwanda.

We’ve talked about drones before (see my Drones as a leapfrog technology post) and how they could be another leapfrog 3rd world countries into the 21st century. Similar, to cell phones, drones could be used to advance infrastructure without having to go replicate the same paths as 1st world countries such as building roads/hiways, trains and other transport infrastructure.

The country

Rwanda is a very hilly but small (10.2K SqMi/26.3 SqKm) and populous (pop. 11.3m) country in east-central Africa, just a few degrees south of the Equator. Rwanda’s economy is based on subsistence agriculture with a growing eco-tourism segment.

Nonetheless, with all
its hills and poverty roads in Rwanda are not the best. In the past delivering blood supplies to remote health centers could often take hours or more. But with the new Zipline drone delivery service technicians can order up blood products with an app on a smart phone and have it delivered via parachute to their center within 20 minutes.

Drone delivery operations

In the nest, a center for drone operations, there is a tent housing the blood supplies, and logistics for the drone force. Beside the tent are a steel runway/catapults that can launch drones and on the other side of the tent are brown inflatable pillows  used to land the drones.

The drones take a pre-planned path to the remote health centers and drop their cargo via parachute to within a five meter diameter circle.

Operators fly the drones using an iPad and each drone has an internal navigation system. Drones fly a pre-planned flightaugmented with realtime kinematic satellite navigation. Drone travel is integrated within Rwanda’s controlled air space. Routes are pre-mapped using detailed ground surveys.

Drone delivery works

Zipline drone blood deliveries have been taking place since late 2016. Deliveries started M-F, during daylight only. But by April, they were delivering 7 days a week, day and night.

Zipline currently only operates in Rwanda and only delivers blood but they have plans to extend deliveries to other medical products and to expand beyond Rwanda.

On their website they stated that before Zipline, delivering blood to one health center would take four hours by truck which can now be done in 17 minutes. Their Muhanga drone center serves 21 medical centers throughout western Rwanda.

Photo Credits: Flyzipline.com

The fragility of public cloud IT

I have been reading AntiFragile again (by Nassim Taleb). And although he would probably disagree with my use of his concepts, it appears to me that IT is becoming more fragile, not less.

For example, recent outages at major public cloud providers display increased fragility for IT. Yet these problems, although almost national in scope, seldom deter individual organizations from their migration to the cloud.

Tragedy of the cloud commons

The issues are somewhat similar to the tragedy of the commons. When more and more entities use a common pool of resources, occasionally that common pool can become degraded. But because no-one really owns the common resources no one has any incentive to improve the situation.

Now the public cloud, although certainly a common pool of resources, is also most assuredly owned by corporations. So it’s not a true tragedy of the commons problem. Public cloud corporations have a real incentive to improve their services.

However, the fragility of IT in general, the web, and other electronic/data services all increases as they become more and more reliant on public cloud, common infrastructure. And I would propose this general IT fragility is really not owned by any one person, corporation or organization, let alone the public cloud providers.

Pre-cloud was less fragile, post-cloud more so

In the old days of last century, pre-cloud, if a human screwed up a CLI command the worst they could happen was to take out a corporation’s data services. Nowadays, post-cloud, if a similar human screws up a CLI command, the worst that can happen is that major portions of the internet services of a nation go down.

Strange Clouds by michaelroper (cc) (from Flickr)

Yes, over time, public cloud services have become better at not causing outages, but they aren’t going away. And if anything, better public cloud services just encourages more corporations to use them for more data services, causing any subsequent cloud outage to be more impactful, not less

The Internet was originally designed by DARPA to be more resilient to failures, outages and nuclear attack. But by centralizing IT infrastructure onto public cloud common infrastructure, we are reversing the web’s inherent fault tolerance and causing IT to be more susceptible to failures.

What can be done?

There are certainly things that can be done to improve the situation and make IT less fragile in the short and long run:

  1. Use the cloud for non-essential or temporary data services, that don’t hurt a corporation, organization or nation when outages occur.
  2. Build in fault-tolerance, automatic switchover for public cloud data services to other regions/clouds.
  3. Physically partition public cloud infrastructure into more regions and physically separate infrastructure segments within regions, such that any one admin has limited control over an amount of public cloud infrastructure.
  4. Divide an organizations or nations data services across public cloud infrastructures, across as many regions and segments as possible.
  5. Create a National Public IT Safety Board, not unlike the one for transportation, that does a formal post-mortem of every public cloud outage, proposes fixes, and enforces fix compliance.

The National Public IT Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has worked well for air transportation. It relies on the cooperation of multiple equipment vendors, airlines, countries and other parties. It performs formal post mortems on any air transportation failure. It also enforces any fixes in processes, procedures, training and any other activities on equipment vendors, maintenance services, pilots, airlines and other entities that can impact public air transport safety. At the moment, air transport is probably the safest form of transportation available, and much of this is due to the NTSB

We need something similar for public (cloud) IT services. Yes most public cloud companies are doing this sort of work themselves in isolation, but we have a pressing need to accelerate this process across cloud vendors to improve public IT reliability even faster.

The public cloud is here to stay and if anything will become more encompassing, running more and more of the worlds IT. And as IoT, AI and automation becomes more pervasive, data processes that support these services, which will, no doubt run in the cloud, can impact public safety. Just think of what would happen in the future if an outage occurred in a major cloud provider running the backend for self-guided car algorithms during rush hour.

If the public cloud is to remain (at this point almost inevitable) then the safety and continuous functioning of this infrastructure becomes a public concern. As such, having a National Public IT Safety Board seems like the only way to have some entity own IT’s increased fragility due to  public cloud infrastructure consolidation.

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In the meantime, as corporations, government and other entities contemplate migrating data services to the cloud, they should consider the broader impact they are having on the reliability of public IT. When public cloud outages occur, all organizations suffer from the reduced public perception of IT service reliability.

Photo Credits: Fragile by Bart Everson; Fragile Planet by Dave Ginsberg; Strange Clouds by Michael Roper

Ethereum enters the enterprise

Read an article the other day on NYT (Business Giants Announce Creation of … Ethereum).

In case you don’t know Ethereum is a open source, block chain solution that’s different than the software behind Bitcoin and IBM’s Hyperledger (for more on Hyperledger see our Blockchains at IBM post or our GreyBeardsOnStorage podcast with Donna Dillinger, IBM Fellow).

Blockchains are a software based, permanent ledger which can be used to record anything. Bitcoin, Ethereum and Hyperledger are all based on blockchains that provide similar digital information services with varying security, programability, consensus characteristics, etc.

Earth globe within a locked cageBlockchains represent an entirely new way of doing business in the digital world and have the potential to take over many financial services  and other contracting activities that are done today between organizations.

Blockchain services provide the decentralized recording of transactions into an immutable ledger.  The decentralized nature of blockchains makes it difficult (if not impossible) to game the system to record an invalid transaction.

Miners

Ethereum supports an Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM) application which offers customers and users a more programmable blockchain. That is rather than just updating accounts with monetary transactions like Bitcoin does, one can implement specialized transaction processing for updating the immutable ledger. It’s this programability that allows for the creation of “smart contracts” which can be programmatically verified and executed.

MinerEthereum miner nodes are responsible for validating transactions and the state transition(s) that update the ledger. Transactions are grouped in blocks by miners.

Miners are responsible for validating the transaction block and performing a hard mathematical computation or proof of work (PoW) which goes along used to validate the block of transactions. Once the PoW computation is complete, the block is packaged up and the miner node updates its database (ledger) and communicates its result to all the other nodes on the network which updates their transaction ledgers as well. This constitutes one state transition of the Ethereum ledger.

Miners that validate Ethereum transactions get paid in Ethers, which are a form of currency throughout the Ethereum ecosystem.

Blockchain consensus

Ethereum ledger consensus is based on the miner nodes executing the PoW algorithm properly. The current Ethereal PoW algorithm is Ethash, which is an “ASIC resistant” algorithm. What this means is that standard GPUs and (less so) CPUs are already very well optimized to perform this algorithm and any potential ASIC designer, if they could do better, would make more money selling their design to GPU and CPU designers, than trying to game the system.

One problem with Bitcoin is that its PoW is more ASIC friendly, which has led some organizations to developing special purpose ASICs in an attempt to dominate Bitcoin mining. If they can dominate Bitcoin mining, this can  be used to game the Bitcoin consensus system and potentially implement invalid transactions.

Ethereum Accounts

Ethereum has two types of accounts:

  • Contract accounts that are controlled by the EVM application code, or
  • Externally owned accounts (EOA) that are controlled by a set of private keys and represent external agents (miner nodes, people, transaction generating entities)

Contract accounts really are code and data which constitute the EVM bytecode (application). Contract account bytecode is also stored on the Ethereum ledger (when deployed?) and are associated with an EOA that initiates the Contract account.

Contract functionality is written in Solidity, Serpent, Lisp Like Language (LLL) or other languages that can be compiled into EVM bytecode. Smart contracts use Ethereum Contract accounts to validate and execute contract actions.

Ethereum gas pricing

As EVMs contract accounts can consume arbitrary amounts of computation, bandwidth and storage to process transactions,   Ethereum uses a concept called “gas” to pay for their resource consumption.

When a contract account transaction is initiated, it identifies a gas price (in Ethers) and a maximum gas amount that it is willing to consume to process the transaction.

When a contract transaction takes place:

  • If the maximum gas amount is less than what the transaction consumes, then the transaction is executed and is applied to the ledger. Any left over or remaining gas Ethers is credited back to the EOA.
  • If the maximum gas amount is not enough to execute the transaction, then the transaction fails and no update occurs.

Enterprise Ethereum Alliance

What’s new to Ethereum is that Accenture, Bank of New York Mellon, BP, CreditSuisse, Intel, Microsoft, JP Morgan, UBS and many others have joined together to form the Enterprise Ethereum Alliance. The alliance intends to work to create a standard version of the Ethereum software that enterprise companies can use to manage smart contracts.

Microsoft has had a Azure Blockchain-as-a-Service online since 2015.  This was based on an earlier version of Ethereum called Project Bletchley.

Ethereum seems to be an alternative to IBM Hyperledger, which offers another enterprise class block chain for smart contracts. As enterprise class blockchains look like they will transform the way companies do business in the future, having multiple enterprise class blockchain solutions seems smart to many companies.

Comments?

Photo Credit(s): Miner by Mark Callahan; Gas prices by Corpsman.com; File: Ether pharmecie.jpg by Wikimedia

 

A college course on identifying BS

Read an article the other day from Recode (These University of Washington professors teaching a course on Calling BS) that seems very timely. The syllabus is online (Calling Bullshit — Syllabus) and it looks like a great start on identifying falsehood wherever it can be found.

In the beginning, what’s BS?

The course syllabus starts out referencing Brandolini’s Bullshit Asymmetry Principal (Law): the amount of energy needed to refute BS is an order of magnitude bigger than to produce it.

Then it goes into a rather lengthy definition of BS from Harry Frankfort’s 1986 On Bullshit article. In sum, it starts out reviewing a previous author’s discussions on Humbug and ends up at the OED. Suffice it to say Frankfurt’s description of BS runs the gamut from: Deceptive misrepresentation to short of lying.

They course syllabus goes on to reference two lengthy discussions/comments on Frankfurt’s seminal On Bullshit article, but both Cohen’s response, Deeper into BS and Eubank & Schaeffer’s A kind word for BS: …  are focused more on academic research rather than everyday life and news.

How to mathematically test for BS

The course then goes into mathematical tests for BS that range from Fermi’s questions, the Grim Test and Benford’s 1936 Law of Anomalous Numbers. These tests are all ways of looking at data and numbers and estimating whether they are bogus or not. Benford’s paper/book talks about how the first page of logarithms is always more used than others because numbers that start with 1 are more frequent than any other number.

How rumors propagate

The next section of the course (week 4) talks about the natural ecology of BS.

Here there’s reference to an article by Friggeri, et al, on Rumor Cascades, which discusses the frequency with which patently both true, false and partially true/partially false rumors are “shared” on social media (Facebook).

The professors look at a website called Snopes.com which evaluates the veracity of publishes rumors uses this to classify the veracity of rumors. Next they examine how these rumors are shared over time on Facebook.

Summarizing their research, both false and true rumors propagate sporadically on Facebook. But even verified false or mixed true/mixed false rumors (identified by Snopes.com) continue to propagate on Facebook. This seems to indicate that rumor sharers are ignoring the rumor’s truthfulness or are just unaware of the Snopes.com assessment of the rumor.

Other topics on calling BS

The course syllabus goes on to causality (correlation is not causation, a common misconception used in BS), statistical traps and trickery (used to create BS), data visualization (which can be used to hide BS), big data (GiGo leads to BS), publication bias (e.g., most published research presents positive results, where’s all the negative results research…), predatory publishing and scientific misconduct (organizations that work to create BS for others), the ethics of calling BS (the line between criticism and harassment), fake news and refuting BS.

Fake news

The section on Fake News is very interesting. They reference an article in the NYT, The Agency about how a group in Russia have been reaping havoc across the internet with fake news and bogus news sites.

But there’s more another article on NYT website, Inside a fake news sausage factory, details how multiple websites started publishing bogus news and then used advertisement revenue to tell them which bogus news generated more ad revenue – apparently there’s money to be made in advertising fake news. (Sigh, probably explains why I can’t seem to get any sponsors for my websites…).

Improving the course

How to improve their course? I’d certainly take a look at what Facebook and others are doing to identify BS/fake news and see if these are working effectively.

Another area to add might be a historical review of fake rumors, news or information. This is not a new phenomenon. It’s been going on since time began.

In addition, there’s little discussion of the consequences of BS on life, politics, war, etc. The world has been irrevocably changed in the past  on account of false information. Knowing how bad this has been this might lend some urgency to studying how to better identify BS.

There’s a lot of focus on Academia in the course and although this is no doubt needed, most people need to understand whether the news they see every day is fake or not. Focusing more on this would be worthwhile.

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I admire the University of Washington professors putting this course together. It’s really something that everyone needs to understand  nowadays.

They say the lectures will be recorded and published online – good for them. Also, the current course syllabus is for a one credit hour course but they would like to expand it to a three to four credit hour course – another great idea

Comments?

Photo credit(s): The Donation of ConstantineNew York World – Remember the Maine, Public Domain; Benjamin Franklin’s Bag of Scalps letter;  fake-news-rides-sociales by Portal GDA

Mixed progress on self-driving cars

Read an article the other day on the progress in self-driving cars in NewsAtlas (DMV reports self-driving cars are learning — fast). More details are available from their source (CA [California] DMV [Dept. of Motor Vehicles] report).

The article reported on what’s called disengagement events that occurred on CA roads. This is where a driver has to take over from the self-driving automation to deal with a potential mis-queue, mistake, or accident.

Waymo (Google) way out ahead

It appears as if Waymo, Google’s self-driving car spin out, is way ahead of the pack. It reported only 124 disengages for 636K mi (~1M km) or ~1 disengage every ~5.1K mi (~8K km). This is ~4.3X better rate than last year, 1 disengage for every ~1.2K mi (1.9K km).

Competition far behind

Below I list some comparative statistics (from the DMV/CA report, noted above), sorted from best to worst:

  • BMW: 1 disengage 638 mi (1027 km)
  • Ford: 3 disengages for 590 mi (~950 km) or 1 disengage every ~197 mi (~317 km);
  • Nissan: 23 disengages for 3.3K mi (3.5K km) or 1 disengage every ~151 mi (~243 km)
  • Cruise (GM) automation: had 181 disengagements for ~9.8K mi (~15.8K km) or 1 disengage every ~54 mi (~87 km)
  • Delphi: 149 disengages for ~3.1K mi (~5.0K km) or 1 disengage every ~21 mi (~34 km);

There was no information on previous years activities so no data on how competitors had improved over the last year.

Please note: the report only applies to travel on California (CA) roads. Other competitors are operating in other countries and other states (AZ, PA, & TX to name just a few). However, these rankings may hold up fairly well when combined with other state/country data. Thousand(s) of kilometers should be adequate to assess self-driving cars disengagement rates.

Waymo moving up the (supply chain) stack

In addition, according to a Recode, (The Google car was supposed to disrupt the car industry) article, Waymo is moving from a (self-driving automation) software supplier to a hardware and software supplier to the car industry.

Apparently, Google has figured out how to reduce their sensor (hardware) costs by a factor of 10X, bringing the sensor package down from $75K to $7.5K, (most probably due to a cheaper way to produce Lidar sensors – my guess).

So now Waymo is doing about ~65 to ~1000 X more (CA road) miles than any competitor, has a much (~8 to ~243 X) better disengage rate and is  moving to become a major auto supplier in both hardware and software.

It’s going to be an interesting century.

If the 20th century was defined by the emergence of the automobile, the 21st will probably be defined by dominance of autonomous operations.

Comments?

Photo credits: Substance E′TS; and Waymo on the road

 

Hitachi and the coming IoT gold rush

img_7137Earlier this week I attended Hitachi Summit 2016 along with a number of other analysts and Hitachi executives where Hitachi discussed their current and ongoing focus on the IoT (Internet of Things) business.

We have discussed IoT before (see QoM1608: The coming IoT tsunami or not, Extremely low power transistors … new IoT applications). Analysts and companies predict  ~200B IoT devices by 2020 (my QoM prediction is 72.1B 0.7 probability). But in any case there’s a lot of IoT activity going to come online, very shortly. Hitachi is already active in IoT and if anything, wants it to grow, significantly.

Hitachi’s current IoT business

Hitachi is uniquely positioned to take on the IoT business over the coming decades, having a number of current businesses in industrial processes, transportation, energy production, water management, etc. Over time, all these industries and more are becoming much more data driven and smarter as IoT rolls out.

Some metrics indicating the scale of Hitachi’s current IoT business, include:

  • Hitachi is #79 in the Fortune Global 500;
  • Hitachi’s generated $5.4B (FY15) in IoT revenue;
  • Hitachi IoT R&D investment is $2.3B (over 3 years);
  • Hitachi has 15K customers Worldwide and 1400+ partners; and
  • Hitachi spends ~$3B in R&D annually and has 119K patents

img_7142Hitachi has been in the OT (Operational [industrial] Technology) business for over a century now. Hitachi has also had a very successful and ongoing IT business (Hitachi Data Systems) for decades now.  Their main competitors in this IoT business are GE and Siemans but neither have the extensive history in IT that Hitachi has had. But both are working hard to catchup.

Hitachi Rail-as-a-Service

img_7152For one example of what Hitachi is doing in IoT, they have recently won a 27.5 year Rail-as-a-Service contract to upgrade, ticket, maintain and manage all new trains for UK Rail.  This entails upgrading all train rolling stock, provide upgraded rail signaling, traffic management systems, depot and station equipment and ticketing services for all of UK Rail.

img_7153The success and profitability of this Hitachi service offering hinges on their ability to provide more cost efficient rail transport. A key capability they plan to deliver is predictive maintenance.

Today, in UK and most other major rail systems, train high availability is often supplied by using spare rolling stock, that’s pre-positioned and available to call into service, when needed. With Hitachi’s new predictive maintenance capabilities, the plan is to reduce, if not totally eliminate the need for spare rolling stock inventory and keep the new trains running 7X24.

img_7145Hitachi said their new trains capture 48K data items and generate over ~25GB/train/day. All this data, will be fed into their new Hitachi Insight Group Lumada platform which includes Pentaho, HSDP (Hitachi Streaming Data Platform) and their Content Analytics to analyze train data and determine how best to keep the trains running. Behind all this analytical power will no doubt be HDS HCP object store used to keep track of all the train sensor data and other information, Hitachi UCP servers to process it all, and other Hitachi software and hardware to glue it all together.

The new trains and services will be rolled out over time, but there’s a pretty impressive time table. For instance, Hitachi will add 120 new high speed trains to UK Rail by 2018.  About the only thing that Hitachi is not directly responsible for in this Rail-as-a-Service offering, is the communications network for the trains.

Hitachi other IoT offerings

Hitachi is actively seeking other customers for their Rail-as-a-service IoT service offering. But it doesn’t stop there, they would like to offer smart-water-as-a-service, smart-city-as-a-service, digital-energy-as-a-service, etc.

There’s almost nothing that Hitachi currently supplies as industrial products that they wouldn’t consider offering in an X-as-a-service solution. With HDS Lumada Analytics, HCP and HDS storage systems, Hitachi UCP converged infrastructure, Hitachi industrial products, and Hitachi consulting services, together they are primed to take over the IoT-industrial products/services market.

Welcome to the new Hitachi IoT world.

Comments?

Blockchains at IBM

img_6985-2I attended IBM Edge 2016 (videos available here, login required) this past week and there was a lot of talk about their new blockchain service available on z Systems (LinuxONE).

IBM’s blockchain software/service  is based on the open source, Open Ledger, HyperLedger project.

Blockchains explained

1003163361_ba156d12f7We have discussed blockchain before (see my post on BlockStack). Blockchains can be used to implement an immutable ledger useful for smart contracts, electronic asset tracking, secured financial transactions, etc.

BlockStack was being used to implement Private Key Infrastructure and to implement a worldwide, distributed file system.

IBM’s Blockchain-as-a-service offering has a plugin based consensus that can use super majority rules (2/3+1 of members of a blockchain must agree to ledger contents) or can use consensus based on parties to a transaction (e.g. supplier and user of a component).

BitCoin (an early form of blockchain) consensus used data miners (performing hard cryptographic calculations) to determine the shared state of a ledger.

There can be any number of blockchains in existence at any one time. Microsoft Azure also offers Blockchain as a service.

The potential for blockchains are enormous and very disruptive to middlemen everywhere. Anywhere ledgers are used to keep track of assets, information, money, etc, that undergo transformations, transitions or transactions as they are further refined, produced and change hands, can be easily tracked in blockchains.  The only question is can these assets, information, currency, etc. be digitally fingerprinted and can that fingerprint be read/verified. If such is the case, then blockchains can be used to track them.

New uses for Blockchain

img_6995IBM showed a demo of their new supply chain management service based on z Systems blockchain in action.  IBM component suppliers record when they shipped component(s), shippers would record when they received the component(s), port authorities would record when components arrived at port, shippers would record when parts cleared customs and when they arrived at IBM facilities. Not sure if each of these transitions were recorded, but there were a number of records for each component shipment from supplier to IBM warehouse. This service is live and being used by IBM and its component suppliers right now.

Leanne Kemp, CEO Everledger, presented another example at IBM Edge (presumably built on z Systems Hyperledger service) used to track diamonds from mining, to cutter, to polishing, to wholesaler, to retailer, to purchaser, and beyond. Apparently the diamonds have a digital bar code/fingerprint/signature that’s imprinted microscopically on the diamond during processing and can be used to track diamonds throughout processing chain, all the way to end-user. This diamond blockchain is used for fraud detection, verification of ownership and digitally certify that the diamond was produced in accordance of the Kimberley Process.

Everledger can also be used to track any other asset that can be digitally fingerprinted as they flow from creation, to factory, to wholesaler, to retailer, to customer and after purchase.

Why z System blockchains

What makes z Systems a great way to implement blockchains is its securely, isolated partitioning and advanced cryptographic capabilities such as z System functionality accelerated hashing, signing & securing and hardware based encryption to speed up blockchain processing.  z Systems also has FIPS-140 level 4 certification which can provide the highest security possible for blockchain and other security based operations.

From IBM’s perspective blockchains speak to the advantages of the mainframe environments. Blockchains are compute intensive, they require sophisticated cryptographic services and represent formal systems of record, all traditional strengths of z Systems.

Aside from the service offering, IBM has made numerous contributions to the Hyperledger project. I assume one could just download the z Systems code and run it on any LinuxONE processing environment you want. Also, since Hyperledger is Linux based, it could just as easily run in any OpenPower server running an appropriate version of Linux.

Blockchains will be used to maintain the system of record of the future just like mainframes maintained the systems of record of today and the past.

Comments?

 

EMCWorld2015 Day 2&3 news

Some additional news from EMCWorld2015 this week:

IMG_4527 IMG_4528 IMG_4531EMC announced directed availability for DSSD, their Rack scale shared Flash storage solution using a PCIe3 (switched) fabric with 36 dual ported, flash modules, which hold 512 NAND chips for 144TB NAND flash storage. On the stage floor they had a demonstration pitting a  40 node Hadoop cluster with DAS against a 15 node Hadoop cluster using the DSSD, both running HIVE and working on the same Query. By the time the 40node/DAS solution got to about 2% of the query completion the 15node/DSSD based cluster had finished the query without breaking a sweat. They then ran an even more complex query and it took no time at all.

They also simulated a copy of a 4TB file (~32K-128K IOs) from memory to memory and it took literally seconds, then copied it to SSD that took considerably longer (didn’t catch how long but much longer than memory), and then they showed the same file copy to DSSD and it only took seconds, almost looked exactly a smidgen slower than the memory to memory copy.

They said the PCIe fabric (no indication what the driver was) provided much more parallelism to the dual ported flash storage that the system was almost able to complete the 4TB copy at memory to memory speeds. It was all pretty impressive, albeit a simulation of the real thing.

EMC indicated that they designed the flash modules themselves and expect to double capacity of the DSSD to 288TB shortly. They showed the controller board that had a mezzanine board over a part of it, but together had 12 major chips on it which I assume had something to do with the PCIe fabric. They said there were two controllers in the system for high availability and the 144TB DSSD was deployed in 5U of space.

I can see how this would play well for real time analytics, high frequency trading and HPC environments but there’s more to shared storage than just speed. Cost wasn’t mentioned neither was the software driver but with the ease with which it worked on the Hive query, I can only assume at some lever it must look something like a DAS device but with memory access times… NVMe anyone?

Project CoprHD was announced which open sourced EMC’s ViPR Controller software. Many ViPR customers were asking for EMC to open source ViPR controller, apparently their listening. Hopefully this will enable some participation from non-EMC storage vendors to allow their storage to be brought under the management of ViPR Controller. I believe the intent is to have an EMC hardened/supported version of Project CoprHD or ViPR Controller to coexist with the open source project version which anyone can download and modify for themselves.

A Non-production, downloadable version of ScaleIO was also announced. The test-dev version is a free download with unlimited capacity, full functionality and available for an unlimited time but only for non-production use.  Another of the demos onstage this morning was Chad configuring storage across a ScaleIO cluster and using its QoS services to limit the impact of a specific workload. There was talk that ScaleIO was available previously as a free download but it took a bunch of effort to find and download. They have removed all these prior hindrances and soon, if not today it’s freely available for anyone. ScaleIO runs on VMware and other hypervisors (maybe bare metal as well). So if you wanted to get your feet wet with software defined storage, this sounds like the perfect opportunity.

ECS is being added to EMC’s Data Lake foundation. Not exactly sure what are all the components in the data lake solution but previously the only Data Lake storage was Isilon based. This week EMC added Elastic Cloud Storage to the picture. Recall that Elastic Cloud Storage comes in either a software only or hardware appliance deployment and provides object storage.

I missed Project Liberty before but it’s a virtual VNX appliance, software only version.  I assume this is intended for ROBO deployments or very low end business environments. Presumably it runs on VMware and has some sort of storage limitations. It seems, more and more of EMC products are coming out in virtual appliance versions.

Project Falcon was also announced which is a virtual Data Domain appliance, software only solution, targeted for ROBO environments and other small enterprises. The intent is to have an onramp for DataDomain backup storage.  I assume runs under VMware.

Project Caspian – rolling out CloudScaling orchestration/automation for OpenStack deployments. On the big stage today, Chad and Jeremy demonstrated Project Caspian on a VCE VxRACK deploying racks of servers under OpenStack control. They were able within a couple of clicks define and deploy openstack on bare metal hardware and deploy applications to the OpenStack servers. They had a monitoring screen which showed the OpenStack server activity (transactions) in real time and showed an over commit of the rack and how easy it was to add a new rack with more servers. All this seemed to take but a few clicks. The intent is not to create another OpenStack distribution but to provide an orchestration/automation/monitoring layer of software on top of OpenStack to “industrialize OpenStack” for enterprise users. Looked pretty impressive to me.

I would have to say the DSSD box was most impressive. It would have been interesting to get an upclose look at the box with some more specifications but they didn’t have one on the Expo floor.