Facebook down to 1.08 PUE and counting for cold storage

prineville-servers-470Read a recent article in ArsTechnica about Facebook’s cold storage archive and their sustainable data centers (How Facebook puts petabytes of old cat pix on ice in the name of sustainability). In the article there was a statement that Facebook had achieved a 1.08 PUE (Power Usage Effectiveness) for one of these data centers. This means for every 100 Watts used to power up racks, Facebook needed to add 8 Watts for other overhead.

Just last year I wrote a paper for a client where I interviewed the CEO of an outsourced data center provider (DuPont Fabros Technology) whose state of the art new data centers were achieving a PUE of from 1.14 to 1.18. For Facebook to run their cold storage data centers at 1.08 PUE is even better.

At the moment, Facebook has two cold storage data centers one at Prineville, OR and the other at Forest City, NC (Forest City achieved the 1.08 PUE). The two cold data storage sites add to the other Facebook data centers that handle everything else in the Facebook universe.

MAID to the rescue

First off these are just cold storage data centers, over an EB of data, but still archive storage, racks and racks of it. How they decide something is cold or hot seems to depend on last use. For example, if a picture has been referenced recently then it’s warm, if not then it’s cold.

Second, they have taken MAID (massive array of idle disks) to a whole new data center level. That is each 1U (Knox storage tray) shelf has 30 4TB drives and a rack has 16 of these storage trays, holding 1.92PB of data. At any one time, only one drive in each storage tray is powered up at a time. The racks have dual servers and only one power shelf (due to the reduced power requirements).

They also use pre-fetch hints provided by the Facebook application to cache user data.  This means they will fetch some images ahead of time,when users areis paging through photos in stream in order to have them in cache when needed. After the user looks at or passes up a photo, it is jettisoned from cache, the next photo is pre-fetched. When the disks are no longer busy, they are powered down.

Less power conversions lower PUE

Another thing Facebook is doing is reducing the number of power conversions that need to happen to power racks. In a typical data center power comes in at 480 Volts AC,  flows through the data center UPS and then is dropped down to 208 Volts AC at the PDU which flows to the rack power supply which is then converted to 12 Volts DC.  Each conversion of electricity generally sucks up power and in the end only 85% of the energy coming in reaches the rack’s servers and storage.

In Facebooks data centers, 480 Volts AC is channeled directly to the racks which have an in rack battery backup/UPS and rack’s power bus converts the 480 Volt AC to 12 Volt DC or AC directly as needed. By cutting out the data center level UPS and the PDU energy conversion they save lots of energy overhead which can be used to better power the racks.

Free air cooling helps

Facebook data centers like Prineville also make use of “fresh air cooling” that mixes data center air with outside air, that flows through through “wetted media” to cool which is then sent down to cool the racks by convection.  This process keeps the rack servers and storage within the proper temperature range but probably run hotter than most data centers this way. How much fresh air is brought in depends on outside temperature, but during most months, it works very well.

This is in contrast to standard data centers that use chillers, fans and pumps to keep the data center air moving, conditioned and cold enough to chill the equipment. All those fans, pumps and chillers can consume a lot of energy.

Renewable energy, too

Lately, Facebook has made obtaining renewable energy to power their data centers a high priority. One new data center close to the Arctic Circle was built there because of hydro-power, another in Iowa and one in Texas were built in locations with wind power.

All of this technology, open sourced

Facebook has open sourced all of it’s hardware and data center systems. That is the specifications for all the hardware discussed above and more is available from the Open Compute Organization, including the storage specification(s), open rack specification(s) and data center specification(s) for these data centers.

So if you want to build your own cold storage archive that can achieve 1.08 PUE, just pick up their specs and have at it.

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Picture Credits: DataCenterKnowledge.Com

 

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