Where should IoT data be processed – part 2

I wrote a post a while back on Where IOT data should be processed – part 1. We will get back to that post in a moment, but recently I read an article (How big data forced the hunt for ET intelligence to evolve) that mentioned after 20 years, they were shutting down SETI@home.

SETI@home was a crowdsourced computational network that took snippets of radio spectrum, sent them to 1000s of home computers to be analyzed during idle computer time, once processed the analysis was sent back to SETI@home. It was one of the first to use a crowdsourced approach to perform data processing. The data was collected at a radio telescope, sent to SETI@home and distributed from there.

6 Factors for IOT data processing

In my post I talked about 6 factors that should help determine where data is processed. Those 6 factors included

  • Data size which is a measure of the amount (GB, TB or PBs) of data that is being generated at an IOT node
  • Data pipe availability, which is all about the networking bandwidth that’s available at the IOT node. If we are talking some sort of low-bandwidth networking access then it probably makes sense to process the data more locally and send only results of processing up the stack.
  • Processing criticality which indicates how important is the processing of the data. If the processing could save a life then maybe it should be done as close as possible to where the data is generated. If the data processing is less critical it could perhaps be done at other nodes in an IOT network
  • Processing time and infrastructure cost which is all about what sort of computational resources are required to perform the processing and how much would it cost. If processing of the data is to undergo multiple passes or requires multi-core CPUs or GPUs, moving data off the IoT node and onto a more comprehensive server to process it, could make sense.
  • Compliance, governance and archive requirements, which discussed the potential need for all data to be available for regulatory audits and as such may need to be available at a central location anyway so why not perform processing there.
  • Data information funnel, which talked about the fact that an IoT network should be configured in layers and that each layer in the stack should probably be responsible for some portion of the data processing needed by the overall system, if nothing more than compressing the information before it is sent elsewhere.

Now that I review the list, the last, Data information funnel, factor really should be a function of the other factors rather than a separate factor.

In that blog post I promised to follow it up with some examples of the logic applied to real world problems. SETI is the first one I’ve seen in the literature

SETI’s IoT processing problem

Closeup front view of one antenna of the Allan Telescope Array, a radio telescope for combined radio astronomy and SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) research being built by the University of California at Berkeley, outside San Francisco. The first phase, consisting of 42 6 meter dish antennas like the one shown here, was completed in 2007. Eventually it will have 350 antennas. This type of antenna is called an offset Gregorian design. The incoming radio waves are reflected by the large parabolic dish onto a secondary concave parabolic reflector in front of the dish, and then into a feed horn. A metal shroud can be seen along the bottom of the secondary reflector which shields the antenna from ground noise. It covers the frequency range from 0.5 to 11.2 GHz.

The SETI researchers found that “The telescopes are now capable of producing so much data that it’s not possible to get that volume of data out to volunteers,” And “The discovery space is in these massive, massive data streams. And it’s just not efficient to distribute many terabits per second out to volunteers all over the world. It’s more efficient for that data processing to happen at the actual observatory.”

So they moved the data processing for the SETI IoT network from being distributed out to home computers throughout the world to being done at the (telescope) source where the data was originally generated.

This decision seems to rely on a couple of the factors above. Namely the pipe availability and data size factors. They had to move processing because no pipes existed to send Tb of data to 1000s of home computers. And finally, the processing time and infrastructure cost has come down so much, that it was just easier to do the processing onsite.

It doesn’t seem like processing criticality or compliance-governance-archive had any bearing on the decision.

So there’s the first example that seems to fit well into our data processing framework.

~~~~

We ought to be able to come up with a formula that uses all these factors and comes up to with a yes or no as to whether to process the data on the node or not.

Photo Credit(s)

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.