The rise of MinIO object storage

MinIO presented at SFD21 a couple of weeks back (see videos here). They had a great session, as always with Jonathan and AB leading the charge. We’ve had a couple of GreyBeardsOnStorage podcasts with AB as well (listen and see GreyBeards talk open source S3… and GreyBeards talk Data Persistence …). We first talked with MinIO last year at SFD 19 where AB made a great impression on the bloggers (see videos here)

Their customers run the gamut from startups to F500. AB said that ~58% of the F500 have MinIO installed and over 8% of the F500 have added capacity over the last year. AB said they have a big presence in Finance, e.g., the 10 largest banks run MinIO, also the auto and Space/Defense sectors have adopted their product.

One reason for the later two sectors (auto & space/defense) is the size of MinIO’s binary, 50MB. And my guess for why the rest of those customers have adopted MinIO is because it’s S3 API compatible, it’s open source, and it’s relatively inexpensive.

Object storage trends

Customers running in the cloud have a love-hate relationship with object storage, they love that it scales but hate what it costs. There are numerous on prem object storage alternatives from traditional and non-traditional storage vendors, but most are deployed on appliances.

With appliances, customers have to order, wait for delivery, rack-configure-set up and after maybe weeks to months finally they have object storage on prem. But with MinIO a purely software, open source solution, it can be tried by merely downloading a couple of (Docker) containers and deployed/activated in under an hour..

As mentioned above, MinIO is API compatible with AWS S3 which helps with adoption. Moreover, now that it’s an integral part of VMware (see their new Data Persistence Platform), it can be enabled in seconds on your standard enterprise VMware cluster with Tanzu.

The other trend is that the edge needs storage, and lots of it. The main drivers of massive edge storage requirement are TelCos deploying 5G and auto industry’s self-driving cars. But this is just a start, industrial IoT will be generating reams of sensor log data at the edge, it will need to be stored somewhere. And what better place to store all this data, but on object storage. Furthermore, all this is driving more adoption of object storage, with MinIO picking up the lion’s share of deployments.

In addition, MinIO recently ported their software to run on ARM. AB said this was to support the expanding hobbyist and developers community driving edge innovation.

And then there was Kubernetes. Everyone in the industry (with the possible exception of Google) is surprised by the adoption of K8S. Google essentially gifted ~$1Bs in R&D on how to scale apps to the world of IT, and now any startup, anywhere, can scale with as well as Google can. And scaling is the “killer app” for the SW industry.

But performance isn’t bad either

Jonathan made mention of MinIO performance (see MinIO 24 node disk and MinIo 32 node NVMe SSD reports) benchmarks. Their disk data shows avg read and write performance of 16.3GB/s and 9.4GB/s, respectively and their NVMe SSD average read and write performance of 183.2GB/s and 171.3GB/s, respectively. The disk numbers are very good for object storage, but the SSD numbers are spectacular.

It turns out that modern, cloud native apps don’t need quick access to data as much as high data throughput. Modern apps have moved to a processing data in memory rather than off of storage, which means they move (large) chunks of data to memory and crunch on it there, and then spit it back out to storage This type of operating mode seems to scale better (in the cloud at least) than having a high priced storage system servicing a blizzard of IO requests from everywhere.

Other vendors had offered SSD object storage before but it never took off. But nowadays, with NVMe SSDs, MinIO is seeing starting to see healthcare, finance, and any AI/ML workloads all deploying NVMe SSD object storage. Yes for large storage repositories, (object storage’s traditional strongpoint), ie, 5PB to 100PB, disk can’t be beat but where blistering high throughput, is needed, NVMe SSD object storage is the way to go.

Open source vs. open core

AB mentioned that MinIO business model is 100% open source vs. many other vendors that use open source but whose business model is open core. The distinction is that open core vendors use open source as base functionality and then build proprietary, charged for, software features/functions on top of this.

But open source vendors, like MinIO offer all their functionality under an open source license (Apache SM License V2.0, GNU AGPL v3 Open Source license and other FOSS licenses), but if you want to use it commercially, build products with it embedded inside, or have enterprise class support, one purchases a commercial license.

As presented at SFD21, but their website home page has updated numbers reflected below

The pure open source model has some natural advantages:

  1. It’s a great lead gen solution because anyone, worldwide, 7X24X365 can download the software and start using it, (see Docker Hub or MinIO’s download page
  2. It’s a great hiring pool. Anyone, who has contributed to the MinIO open source is potentially a great technical hire. MinIO stats says they have 685 contributors, 19 in just the last month for MinIO base code (see MinIO’s GitHub repo).
  3. It’s a great development organization. With ~20 commits a weekover the last year, there’s a lot going on to add functionality/fix bugs. But that’s the new world of software development. Given all this activity, release frequencies increase, ~4 releases a month ((see GitHub repo insights above).
  4. It’s a great testing pool with, ~480M Docker Pulls (using a Docker container to run a standard, already configured MinIO server, mc, console, etc.) and ~18K enterprises running their solution, that’s an awful lot of users. With open source a lot of eye’s or contributors make all problems visible, but what’s more typical, from my perspective, is the more users that deploy your product, the more bugs they find.

Indeed, with the VMware’s Data Persistence Platform, Tanzu customers can use MinIO’s object storage at the click of a button (or three).

Of course, open source has downsides too. Anyone can access packages directly (from GitHub repo and elsewhere) and use your software. And of course, they can clone, fork and modify your source code, to add any functionality they want to it. Historically, open source subscription licensing models don’t generate as much revenues as appliance purchases do. And finally, open source, because it’s created by geeks, is typically difficult to deploy, configure, and use.

But can they meet the requirements of an Enterprise world

Because most open source is difficult to use, the enterprise has generally shied away from it. But that’s where there’s been a lot of changes to MinIO.

MinIO always had a “mc” (minio [admin] client) that offered a number of administrative services via an API, programmatically controlled interface. but they have recently come out with a GUI offering, the minIO console, which has a similarly functionality to their mc APU. They demoed the console on their SFD21 sessions (see videos above).

Supporting 18K enterprise users, even if only 8% are using it a lot, can be a challenge, but supporting almost a half a billion docker pulls (even if only 1/4th of these is a complete minIO deployment) can be hell on earth. The surprising thing is that MinIO’s commercial license promises customers direct-to-engineer support.

At their SFD21 sessions, AB stated they were getting ~2.7 new (tickets) problems a day. I assume these are what’s just coming in from commercial licensed users and not the general public (using their open source licensed offerings). AB said their average resolution time for these tickets was under 15 minutes.

Enter SubNet, the MinIO Subscription Network and their secret (not open source?) weapon to scale enterprise class support. Their direct-to-engineer support model involves a much, more collaborative approach to solving customer problems then you typical enterprise support with level 1, 2 & 3 support engineers. They demoed SubNet briefly at SFD21, but it could deserve a much longer discussion/demostration.

What little we saw (at SFD21) was that it looked almost like slack-PM dialog between customer and engineer but with unlimited downloads and realtime interaction.

MinIO also supports a very active Slack discussion group with ~11K users. Here anyone can ask a question and it will get answered by anyone. MinIO’s Slack has 2 channels: (Ggeneral and GitHub for notifications). It seems like MinIO is using Slack as a crowdsourced level 1 support.

But in the long run, to continue to offer “direct-to-engineer” levels of support, may require adding a whole lot more engineers. But AB seems prepared to do just that.

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MinIO is an interesting open source S3 API compatible, object storage solution that seems to run just about anywhere, is freely deployable with enterprise class support available (at a price) and has high throughput performance. What’s not to like.

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