Storageless data!?

I (virtually) attended SFD21 earlier this year and a company called Hammerspace presented discussing their vision for storageless data (see videos of their session at SFD21).

We’ve talked them before but now they have something to offer the enterprise – data mobility or storageless data.

The white board after David Flynn’s session at SFD8

In essence, customers want to be able to run their workloads wherever it makes the most sense, on prem, in private cloud, and in the public cloud among other places. Historically, it’s been relatively painless to transfer an application’s binary from one to another data center, to a managed service provider or to the public cloud.

And with VMware Cloud Foundation, Kubernetes, Docker and Linux operating everywhere, the runtime environment and other OS services that applications depend on are pretty much available in any of those locations. So now customers have 2 out of 3, what’s left?

It’s all about the Data

Data can take a very long time to move around a data center, let alone across the web between locations. MBs and even GBs of data may be relatively painless to move, but TBs of data can be take days, and moving PBs of data is suicidal.

For instance, when we signed up for a globally accessible file synch and share storage service, I probably had 75GB or so of data I wanted managed. It took literally several days of time to upload this. Yes, I didn’t have data center class internet access, but even that might have only sped this up 2-5X. Ok, now try this with 1TB or more and it’s pretty much going to take days, and you can easily multiple that by 10 to do a PB or more. And that’s if it happens to continue to perform the transfer without disruption.

So what’s Hammerspace storageless data got to do with any of this.

Hammerspace’s idea

It’s been sort of a ground truth of storage, since I’ve been in the industry (40+ years now), that not all random IO data is accessed at the same frequency. That is, some data is accessed a lot and other data accessed hardly at all. That’s why DRAM caching of data can be so important to a host or storage system.

Similarly for sequential access, if you can get the first blocks of data to the host and then stream the rest in time, a storage system can appear to read fast.

Now I won’t go into all the tricks of doing good data caching, (the secret sauce to every vendor’s enterprise storage), but if you can appear to cache data well, you don’t actually need to transfer all the data associated with an application to a location it’s running in, you can appear as if all the data is there, when actually only some of it is present.

Essentially, Hammerspace creates a global file system for your data, across any locations you wish to use it, with great caching, optimized data transfer and with real storage behind it. Servers running your applications mount a Hammerspace file system/share that stitches together all the file storage behind it, across all the locations it’s operating in.

An application request goes to Hammerspace and if the data is not present there, Hammerspace goes and fetches and caches blocks of data as fast as it can. This will let the application start performing IO while the rest of the data is being cached and if allowed, moved to the new location.

Storage can be not managed by Hammerspace, read-write managed by Hammerspace or read-only managed by Hammerspace. For customers who want the whole Hammerspace storageless data functionality they would use read-write mode. For those who just want to access data elsewhere read-only would suffice. Customers who want to continue to access data directly but want read access globally, would use the read-only mode.

Once read-write storage is assigned to Hammerspace grabs all the file metadata information on the storage system. Once this process completes, customers no longer access this file data directly, but rather must access it through Hammerspace. At that point, this data is essentially storageless and can be accessed wherever Hammerspace services are available.

How does Hammerspace do it

Behind the scenes is a lot of technology. Some of which is discussed in the SFD21 sessions (see video’s above). Hammerspace is not in the data path but rather in the control path of data access. But it does orchestrate data movement, and it does route data IO requests from an application to where the data (currently) resides.

Hammerspace also supports Service Level Objectives (SLOs) for performance, geolocation, security, data protection options,, etc. These can be used to keep data in particular regions, to encrypt data (using KMIP), ensure high performance, high data availability, etc.

Hammerspace can manage data across 32 separate sites. It takes a couple of hours to deploy. per site. Each site has a Hammerspace metadata service with standalone access to all data within that site. For example, standalone access could be used, in the event of a network loss.

At the moment, they support eventual consistency and don’t support a global lock service. Rather, Hammerspace uses a conflict resolution service in the event data is overwritten by two or more applications. For any file that was being updated in two or more locations, that file would be flagged as in conflict, Hammerspace would provide snapshots of the various versions of the file(s) and it would require some sort of manual intervention to resolve the conflict. Each location would have (temporary) access to the data it had written directly, but at some point the conflict would need resolution.

They also support NFS and SMB file access for the front end and use object storage services for backend data. Data is copied on demand to the local site’s storage when accessed based on the SLO policies in effect for it. During data movement it is copied up, temporarily into objects on AWS, Microsoft Azure, or GCP, and then copied down to the location it’s being moved to. I believe this temporary object data is encrypted and compressed. Hammerspace support KMIP key providers.

Pricing for Hammerspace is on a managed capacity basis. But anyone can use Hammerspace for up to 10TB for free. Hammerspace is available in AWS marketplace for configuration there.

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Well it’s been a long time coming, but it appears to be here. Any customers wanting hybrid-cloud operations or global access to their data would be remiss to not check out Hammerspace.

[Edited after posting, The Eds.]

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