Dell EMC PowerStore X and the Edge – TFDxDell

This past summer I attended a virtual TFDxDell event where there was a number of sessions discussing Dell EMC technologies for the enterprise. One session sort of struck a nerve, the Dell EMC PowerStore session and I have finally figured out what interested me most in their talk, their PowerStore X appliances and AppsON technologies

What is AppsON and PowerStore X appliance?

Essentially PowerStore X with AppsON has an onboard ESXi hypervisor which allows customers to run vSphere VMs inside the storage system with direct vVol (I assume) access to PowerStore data storage without having to go out over a (storage) network.

PowerStore X ESXi is a little behind the most recent VMware vSphere releases (at least 30 days) but it’s current enough for most shops. In non-PowerStore X appliances, PowerStoreOS runs as containers but in PowerStore X, PowerStoreOS storage functionality runs as VMs, just like any other VMs running on its ESXi hypervisor.

Moreover, PowerStore X can still service IOs from other non-PowerStore X resident VMs or bare metal applications running in the environment. In this way you get all the data services of an enterprise class storage system, that also run VMs.

With PowerStore OS 2.0 they have added scale out to AppsON. That is any PowerStore X (1000X, 3000X, 5000X or 7000X) appliance, in a PowerStore X cluster, can have their VMs move from one appliance to another using vSphere vMotion. This means that as your PowerStore X storage clusters grow, you can rebalance VM application workloads across the cluster. A PowerStore X cluster can contain up to 4 PowerStore X appliances.

PowerStore’s heritage goes back quite a ways at Dell and EMC. Prior versions of EMC Unity storage and some of its progenitors had the ability to run applications on the storage itself. But by running an ESXi hypervisor on PowerStore X appliances, it takes all this to a whole new level.

Why would anyone want AppsON?

It’s taken me sometime to understand why anyone would want to use AppsON and I have concluded that the edge might be the best environment to deploy it.

Recent VMware enhancements have reduced minimum node configurations for edge environments to 2 servers. It’s unclear to me whether a single PowerStore X appliance with AppsON is one server or two but, for the moment lets assume its just one. This means that a minimum VMware vSphere edge deployment could use 1 PowerStore X and 1 standalone, ESXi server.

In such an environment, customers could run their data intensive VMs directly on the PowerStore X and some of their non-data intensive VMs on the standalone server. But the flexibility exists to vMotion VMs from one to the other as demand dictates.

But does the edge need storage?

Yes, some do. For instance, take 5G. it enables a whole new class of mobile services and many of them can be quite data intensive. 5G is being deployed around the world as mini-data centers in cell towers. Unclear whether these data centers run vSphere but I’m sure VMware is trying their hardest to make that happen. With vSphere running your 5G mini-datacenter, PowerStore X could make a smart addition.

Then there’s all the smart cars, which are creating TBs of sensor data every time they take to the road. You’re probably not going to have a PowerStore appliance in your smart car (at least anytime soon) but they just might have one at the local service station.

And maybe given all the smart devices in your home, smart cars, smart appliances, smart robots, etc., there’s going to be a whole lot of data generated from your smart home. Having something like PowerStore X in your smart home’s mini-data center would offer a place to hold all that data and to do some processing (compressing maybe) before sending it up to the cloud.

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We have just two more questions for Dell EMC,

  1. Shouldn’t the base PowerStore appliance be called PowerStore K?
  2. Shouldn’t customers be allowed to run their own K8s container apps on their PowerStore K just as easily as running VMs in their PowerStore X?

Legal Disclosure: TechFieldDay and Dell provided gifts to all participants (including me) for the TFDxDell event.

Photo credit(s):

  • From Dell EMC slides presented at TFDxDell event
  • From Dell EMC slides presented at TFDxDell event
  • From Dell EMC slides presented at TFDxDell event

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