Screaming IOP performance with StarWind’s new NVMeoF software & Optane SSDs

Was at SFD17 last week in San Jose and we heard from StarWind SAN (@starwindsan) and their latest NVMeoF storage system that they have been working on. Videos of their presentation are available here. Starwind is this amazing company from the Ukraine that have been developing software defined storage.

They have developed their own NVMe SPDK for Windows Server. Intel doesn’t currently offer SPDK for Windows today, so they developed their own. They also developed their own initiator (CentOS Linux) for NVMeoF. The target system was a multicore server running Windows Server with a single Optane SSD that they used to test their software.

Extreme IOP performance consumes cores

During their development activity they tested various configurations. At the start of their development they used a Windows Server with their NVMeoF target device driver. With this configuration and on a bare metal server, they found that they could max out the Optane SSD at 550K 4K random write IOPs at 0.6msec to a single Optane drive.

When they moved this code directly to run under a Hyper-V environment, they were able to come close to this performance at 518K 4K write IOPS at 0.6msec. However, this level of IO activity pegged 100% of 8 cores on their 40 core server.

More IOPs/core performance in user mode

Next they decided to optimize their driver code and move as much as possible into user space and out of kernel space, They continued to use Hyper-V. With this level off code, they were able to achieve the same performance as bare metal or ~551K 4K random write IOP performance at the 0.6msec RT and 2.26 GB/sec level. However, they were now able to perform only pegging 2 cores. They expect to release this initiator and target software in mid October 2018!

They converted this functionality to run under ESX/VMware and were able to see much the same 2 cores pegged, ~551K 4K random write IOPS at 0.6msec RT and 2.26 GB/sec. They will have the ESXi version of their target driver code available sometime later this year.

Their initiator was running CentOS on another server. When they decided to test how far they could push their initiator, they were able to drive 4 Optane SSDs at up to ~1.9M 4K random write IOP performance.

At SFD17, I asked what they could have done at 100 usec RT and Max said about 450K IOPs. This is still surprisingly good performance. With 4 Optane SSDs and consuming ~8 cores, you could achieve 1.8M IOPS and ~7.4GB/sec. Doubling the Optane SSDs one could achieve ~3.6M IOPS, with sufficient initiators and target cores with ~14.8GB/sec.

Optane based super computer?

ORNL Summit super computer, the current number one supercomputer in the world, has a sustained throughput of 2.5 TB/sec over 18.7K server nodes. You could do much the same with 337 CentOS initiator nodes, 337 Windows server nodes and ~1350 Optane SSDs.

This would assumes that Starwind’s initiator and target NVMeoF systems can scale but they’ve already shown they can do 1.8M IOPS across 4 Optane SSDs on a single initiator server. Aand I assume a single target server with 4 Optane SSDs and at least 8 cores to service the IO. Multiplying this by 4 or 400 shouldn’t be much of a concern except for the increasing networking bandwidth.

Of course, with Starwind’s Virtual SAN, there’s no data management, no data protection and probably very little in the way of logical volume management. And the ORNL Summit supercomputer is accessing data as files in a massive file system. The StarWind Virtual SAN is a block device.

But if I wanted to rule the supercomputing world, in a somewhat smallish data center, I might be tempted to put together 400 of StarWind NVMeoF target storage nodes with 4 Optane SSDs each. And convert their initiator code to work on IBM Spectrum Scale nodes and let her rip.

Comments?

New website monetization approaches

Historically, websites have made money by selling wares, services or advertising. In the last two weeks it seems like two new business models are starting to emerge. One more publicly supported and the other less publicly supported.

Europe’s new copyright law

According to an article I read recently (This newly approved European copyright law might break the Internet), Article 11 of Europe’s new Copyright Directive (not quite law yet) will require search engines, news aggregators and other users of Internet content to pay a “link tax” to copyright holders of anything they link to. As a long time blogger, podcaster and content provider, I find this new copyright policy very intriguing.

The article proposes that this will bankrupt small publishers as larger ones will charge less for the traffic. But presently, I get nothing for links to my content. And, I’d be delighted to get any amount – in fact I’d match any large publishers link tax amount that the market demands.

But my main concern is the impact this might have on site traffic. If aggregators pay a link tax, why would they want to use content that charges any tax. Yes at some point aggregators need content. But there are many websites full of content, certainly there would be some willing to forego tax fees for more traffic.

I also happen to be a copyright user. Most of my blog posts are from articles I read on the web. I usually link to an article in the 1st one or two paragraphs (see above and below) of a post and may refer (and link) to more that go deeper into a subject. Will I have to pay a link tax to the content owner?

How much of a link tax is anyone’s guess. I’m not sure it would amount to much. But a link tax, if done judiciously might even raise the quality of the content on the web.

Browser’s of the world, lay down your blockchains

The second article was a recent research paper (Digging into browser based crypto mining). Researchers at RWTH Aachen University had developed a new method to associate mined blocks to mining pools as a way to unearth browser-based mined crypto coins. With this technique they estimated that 1.8% of all Monero coins were mined by CoinHive using participant browsers to mine the coin or ~$250K/month from browser mining.

I see this as steeling compute power. But with that much coin being generated, it might be a reasonable way for an honest website to make some cash from people browsing their web pages. The browsing party would need to be informed of the mining operation in the page’s information, sort of like “we use cookies” today.

Just think, someone creates a WP plugin to do ETH mining and when activated, a WP website pops up a message that says “We mine coins while you browse – OK?”.

In another twist perhaps the websites could share the ETH mined on their browser with the person doing the browsing, similar to airline/hotel travel awards. Today most travel is done on corporate dime, but awards go to the person doing the traveling. Similarly, employees could browse using corporate computers but they would keep a portion of the ETH that’s mined while they browse away… Sounds like a deal.

Other monetization approaches

We’ve tried Google AdSense and other advertising but it only generated pennies a month. So, it wasn’t worth it.

We also sell research and occasionally someone buys some (see SCI Research Shop). And I do sell services but not through my website.

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Not sure a link tax will fly. It would be a race to the bottom and anyone that charged a tax would suffer from less links until they decided to charge a $0 link tax.

Maybe if every link had a tax associated with it, whether the site owner wanted it or not there could be a level playing field. Recording, paying/receiving and accounting for all these link tax micro payments would be another nightmare altogether.

But a WP plugin, that announces and mines crypto coins with a user’s approval and splits the profit with them might work. Corporate wouldn’t like it but employees would just be browsing websites, where’s the harm in that.

Browse a website and share the mined crypto coin with site owner. Sounds fine to me.

Photo Credit(s): Strasburg – European Parliament|Giorgio Barlocco

Crypto News Daily – Telegram cancels ICO…

Photo of Bitcoin, Etherium and Litecoin|QuoteInspector

AI processing at the edge

Read a couple of articles over the past few weeks (TechCrunch: Google is making a fast, specialized TPU chip for edge devices … and IEEE Spectrum: Two startups use processing in flash for AI at the edge) about chips for AI at the IoT edge.

The two startups, Syntiant and Mythic, are moving to analog only or analog-digital solutions to provide AI processing needed at the edge while Google is taking their TPU technology to the edge.  We have written about Google’s TPU before (see: TPU and hardware vs. software  innovation (round 3) post).

The major challenge in AI processing at the edge is power consumption. Both  startups attack the power problem by using flash and other analog circuitry to provide power efficient compute.

Google attacked the power problem with their original TPU by reducing computational precision from 64- to 8-bits. By reducing transistor counts, they lowered power requirements proportionally.

AI today is based on neural networks (NN), that connect simulated neurons via simulated synapses with weights attached to indicate whether to boost or decrease the signal being transmitted. AI learning is done by setting those weights and creating the connections between simulated neurons and the synapses.  So learning is setting weights and establishing connections. Actual inferences (using AI to do something) is a process of exciting input simulated neurons/synapses and letting the signal flow through the NN with each weight being used to determine output(s).

AI with standard compute

The problem with doing AI learning or inferencing with normal CPUs or even CUDAs is that the NN does thousands if not millions of  multiplication-accumulation actions at each simulated synapse-neuron connection. Doing all these multiplication-accumulation takes power. CPUs and CUDAs can do these sorts of operations on 32 or 64 bit numbers or even floating point but it still takes power.

AI processing power

AI processing power is measured in trillions of (accumulate-multiply) operations per second per watt (TOPS/W). Mythic believes it can perform 4 TOPS/W and Syntiant says it can do 20 TOPS/W. In comparison, the NVIDIA Volta V100 can do about 0.4 TOPS/W (according to the article). Although  comparing Syntiant-Mythic TOPS to NVIDIA TOPS is a little like comparing apples to oranges.

A current Intel Xeon Platinum 8180M (2.5Ghz, 28 Core processors, 205 W) can probably do (assuming one multiplication-accumulation per hertz) about 2.5 Billion X 28 Cores = 70 Billion Ops Second/205 W or 0.3 GOPS/W (source: Platinum 8180M Data sheet).

As for Google’s TPU TOPS/W, TPU2 is rated at 45 GFLOPS/chip and best guess for power consumption is between 160W and 200W, let’s say 180W. With power at that level, TPU2 should hit 0.25 GFLOPS/W.  TPU3 is coming out with 8X the power but it uses water cooling (read LOTS MORE POWER).

Nonetheless, it appears that Mythic and Syntiant are one to two orders of magnitude better than the best that NVIDIA and TPU2 can do today and many orders of magnitude better than Intel X86.

Improving TOPS/W

Use NAND, as an analog memory to read, write and hold  NN weights is an easy way to reduce power consumption. Combine that with  analog circuitry that can do multiplication and addition with those flash values and you have a AI NN processor. This way you reduce the need to hold weights in memory and do compute in registers by collapsing both compute and memory into the same componentry.

The major difference between Syntiant and Mythic seems to be the amount of analog circuitry they use. Mythic seems to relegate the analog circuitry to an accelerator while Syntiant has a more extensive use of analog circuitry throughout their chip. Probably why it can perform 5X the TOPS/W of Mythic’s IPU.

IBM and others have been working on neuromorphic chips some of which are analog based and others which are all digital based. We’ve written extensively on IBM and some on MIT’s approaches (for the latest on IBM see: More power efficient deep learning through IBM and PCM, and for MIT see: MIT builds an analog synapse chip) and follow the links there to learn more.

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Special purpose AI hardware is emerging from the labs and finally reaching reality. IBM R&D has been playing with it for a long time. Google is working on TPU3 so there’s no stopping them. And startups are seeing an opening and are taking everyone on. Stay tuned, were in for a good long ride before the someone rises above the crowd and becomes the next chip giant.

Comments?

 

Photo Credit(s): TechCrunch  Google is making a fast, specialized TPU chip for edge devices … article

Introduction to Digital Design Verification at Mythic, Medium.com Article

Images from Google Cloud Platform Blog on the TPU

Two startups use processing in flash for AI at the edge, IEEE Spectrum article courtesy of Mythic

Photonic or Optical FPGAs on the horizon

Read an article this past week (Toward an optical FPGA – programable silicon photonics circuits) on a new technology that could underpin optical  FPGAs. The technology is based on implantable wave guides and uses silicon on insulator technology which is compatible with current chip fabrication.

How does the Optical FPGA work

Their Optical FPGA is based on an eraseable direct coupler (DC) built using GE (Germanium) ion implantation. A DC is used when two optical waveguides are placed close enough together such that optical energy (photons) on one wave guide is switched over to the other, nearby wave guide.

As can be seen in the figure, the red (eraseable, implantable) and blue (conventional) wave guides are fabricated on the FPGA. The red wave guide performs the function of DC between the two conventional wave guides. The diagram shows both a single stage and a dual stage DC.

By using imlantable (eraseable) DCs, one can change the path of a photonic circuit by just erasing the implantable wave guide(s).

The GE ion implantable wave guides are erased by passing a laser over it and thus annealing (melting) it.

Once erased, the implantable wave guide DC no longer works. The chart on the left of the figure above shows how long the implantable wave guide needs to be to work. As shown above once erased to be shorter than 4-5µm, it no longer acts as a DC.

It’s not clear how one directs the laser to the proper place on the Optical FPGA to anneal the implantable wave guide but that’s a question of servos and mirrors.

Previous attempts at optical FPGAs, required applying continuing voltage to maintain the switched photonics circuits. Once voltage was withdrawn the photonics reverted back to original configuration.

But once an implantable wave guide is erased (annealed) in their approach, the changes to the Optical FPGA are permanent.

FPGAs today

Electronic FPGAs have never gone out of favor with customers doing hardware innovation. By supplying Optical FPGAs, the techniques in the paper would allow for much more photonics innovation as well.

Optics are primarily used in communications and storage (CD-DVDs) today. But quantum computing could potentially use photonics and there’s been talk of a 100% optical computer for a long time. As more and more photonics circuitry comes online, the need for an optical FPGA grows. The fact that it’s able to be grown on today’s fab lines makes it even more appealing.

But an FPGA is more than just directional control over (electronic or photonic) energy. One needs to have other circuitry in place on the FPGA for it to do work.

For example, if this were an electronic FPGA, gates, adders, muxes, etc. would all be somewhere on the FPGA

However, once having placed additional optical componentry on the FPGA, photonic directional control would be the glue that makes the Optical FPGA programmable.

Comments?

Photo Credit(s): All photos from Toward an optical FPGA – programable silicon photonics circuits paper

 

Skyrmion and chiral bobber solitons for racetrack storage

Read an article this week in Science Daily (Magnetic skyrmions: Not the only one of their class; …) about new magnetic structures that could lend themselves to creating a new type of moving, non-volatile storage.  (There’s more information in the press release and the Nature paper [DOI: 10.1038/s41565-018-0093-3], behind a paywall).

Skyrmions and chiral bobbers are both considered magnetic solitons, types of magnetic structures only 10’s of nm wide, that can move around, in sort of a race track configuration.

Delay line memories

Early in computing history, there was a type of memory called a delay line memory which used various mechanisms (mercury, magneto-resistence, capacitors, etc.) arranged along a circular line such as a wire, and had moving pulses of memory that raced around it. .

One problem with delay line memory was that it was accessed sequentially rather than core which could be accessed randomly. When using delay lines to change a bit, one had to wait until the bit came under the read/write head . It usually took microseconds for a bit to rotate around the memory line and delay line memories had a capacity of a few thousand bits 256-512 bytes per line,  in today’s vernacular.

Delay lines predate computers and had been used for decades to delay any electronic or acoustic signal before retransmission.

A new racetrack

Solitons are being investigated to be used in a new form of delay line memory, called racetrack memory. Skyrmions had been discovered a while ago but the existence of chiral bobbers was only theoretical until researchers discovered them in their lab.

Previously, the thought was that one would encode digital data with only skyrmions and spaces. But the discovery of chiral bobbers and the fact that they can co-exist with skyrmions, means that chiral bobbers and skyrmions can be used together in a racetrack fashion to record digital data.  And the fact that both can move or migrate through a material makes them ideal for racetrack storage.

Unclear whether chiral bobbers and skyrmions only have two states or more but the more the merrier for storage. I am assuming that bit density or reliability is increased by having chiral bobbers in the chain rather than spaces.

Unlike disk devices with both rotating media and moving read-write heads, the motion of skyrmion-chiral bobber racetrack storage is controlled by a very weak pulse of current and requires no moving/mechanical parts prone to wear/tear. Moreover, as a solid state devices, racetrack memory is not sensitive to induced/organic vibration or shock,  So, theoretically these devices should have higher reliability than disk devices.

There was no information comparing the new racetrack memory reliability to NAND or 3D Crosspoint/PCM SSDs, but there may be some advantage here as well. I suppose one would need to understand how to miniaturize the read-erase-write head to the right form factor for nm racetracks to understand how it compares.

And I didn’t see anything describing how long it takes to rotate through bits on a skyrmion-chiral bobber racetrack. Of course, this would depend on the number of bits on a racetrack, but some indication of how long it takes one bit to move, one postition on the racetrack would be helpful to see what its rotational latency might be.

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At the moment, reading and writing skyrmions and the newly discovered chiral bobbers takes a lot of advanced equipment and is only done in major labs. As such, I don’t see a skyrmion-chiral bobber racetrack storage device arriving on my desktop anytime soon. But the fact that there’s a long way to go before, we run out of magnetic storage options, even if it is on a chip rather than magnetic media,  is comforting to know. Even if we don’t ever come up with an economical way to produce it.

I wonder if you could synchronize rotational timing across a number of racetrack devices, at least that way you could be reading/erasing/writing a whole byte, word, double word etc, at a time, rather than a single bit.

Comments?

Photo Credit(s): From Experimental observation of chiral magnetic bobbers in B20 Type FeGe paper

From Experimental observation of chiral magnetic bobbers in B20 Type FeGe paper

From Timeline of computer history Magnetoresistive delay lines

From Experimental observation of chiral magnetic bobbers in B20 Type FeGe paper

Hitachi Vantara HCP, hits it out of the park #datacenternext

We talked with Hitachi Vantara this past week at a special Tech Field Day extra event (see videos here). This was an all day affair and was a broad discussion of Hitachi’s infrastructure portfolio.

There was much of interest in the days session but one in particular caught my eye and that was the session on Hitachi Vantara’s Content Platform (HCP).

Hitachi has a number of offerings surrounding their content platform, including:

  • HCP, on premises object store:
  • HCP Anywhere, enterprise file synch and share using HCP,
  • HCP Content Intelligence, compliance and content search for HCP object storage, and
  • HCP Data Ingestor, file gateway to HCP object storage.

I already knew about these  offerings but had no idea how successful HCP has been over the years. inng to Hitachi Vantara, HCP has over 4000 installations worldwide with over 2000 customers and is currently the number 1 on premises, object storage solution in the world.

For instance, HCP is installed in 4 out of the 5 largest banks, insurance companies, and TelCos worldwide. HCP Anywhere has over a million users with over 15K in Hitachi alone.  Hitachi Vantara has some customers using HCP installations that support 4000-5000 object ingests/sec.

HCP software supports geographically disbursed erasure coding, data compression, deduplication, and encryption of customer object data.

HCP development team has transitioned to using micro services/container based applications and have developed their Foundry Framework to make this easier. I believe the intent is to ultimately redevelop all HCP solutions using Foundry.

Hitachi mentioned a couple of customers:

  • US Government National Archives which uses HCP behind Pentaho to preserve presidential data and metadata for 100 years, and uses all open APIs to do so
  • UK Rabo Bank which uses HCP to support compliance monitoring across a number of data feeds
  • US  Ground Support which uses Pentaho, HCP, HCP Content Intelligence and HCP Anywhere  to support geospatial search to ascertain boats at sea and what they are doing/shipping.

There’s a lot more to HCP and Hitachi Vantara than summarized here and I would suggest viewing the TFD videos and check out the link above for more information.

Comments?

Want to learn more, see these other TFD bloggers posts:

Hitachi is reshaping its IT division by Andrew Mauro (@Andrew_Mauro)

MIT’s new Navion chip for better Nano drone navigation

Read an article this week in Science Daily (Chip upgrade help’s bee-sized drones navigate) about a recent chip created by MIT, called Navion, that reduces size and power consumption for electronics used in drone navigation. The chip is also documented on MIT’s Navion project homepage and in a technical  paper describing the new VIO (Visual-Inertial Odometry ) Navion chip.

The Navion chip can perform inertial measurement at 52Khz as well as process video streams of 752×480 stereo images at 171 frames per second in a 20 sqmm package consuming only 24mW of power. The chip was fabricated on a 65nm CMOS process line.

Navion is the result of a collaborative design process which optimized electronics required to perform  drone navigation processing. By placing all the memory required for inertial measurement and image analysis and all the processing hardware on the same chip, they have substantially reduced power consumption and space requirements for drone navigation.

Navion architecture

Navion uses a state of the art, non-linear factor graph optimization algorithm to navigate in space.  It doesn’t sound like  DL neural net image recognition but more like a statistical/probabilistic approach to image mapping and place estimation. The chip uses image compression, two stage memory, and sparse linear solver memory to reduce image processing memory requirements from 3.5MB to less than 1MB.

The chip uses 3 inputs: two images (right &  left image) and IMU (inertial management unit sensor) and has one (complex output), its estimate of the current state of where it is on the map.

Navion processing creates and maintains a 3D map using stereo images and provides navigational support to move through that space.  According to the paper, the Navion chip updates the state(s) and sparse 3D map at a KF (Kalman filter) rate of between 16 and 90 fps. Navion also offers configurations options to maximize accuracy, throughput or energy efficiency.

Navion compares well to other navigation electronics

The table shows comparisons of the Navion chip against other traditional navigational systems that use Xeon, ARM or FPGA chips. As far as I can tell it’s either much better or at least on a par with these other larger, more complex, power hungry systems.

Nano drones are coming to our space, sooner than anyone expects.

Comments?

Photo credit(s): System overview from Navion project page (c) 2018 MIT;

Picture of chip with layout  from Navion project page (c) 2018 MIT;

Navion: A Fully Integrated Energy-Efficient Visual-Inertial Odometry Accelerator for Autonomous Navigation of Nano Drones (c) 2018 MIT