094: GreyBeards talk shedding light on data with Scott Baker, Dir. Content & Data Intelligence at Hitachi Vantara

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At Hitachi NEXT 2019 Conference, last month, there was a lot of talk about new data services from Hitachi. Keith and I thought it would be a good time to sit down and talk with Scott Baker (@Kraken-Scuba), Director of Content and Data Intelligence, at Hitachi Vantara about what’s going on with data operations these days and how customers are shedding more light on their data.

Information supply chain

Something Scott said in his opening remarks caught my attention when he mentioned customer information supply chains. The information supply chain is similar to manufacturing supply chains, but it’s all about data. Just like manufacturing supply chains where parts and services come from anywhere and are used to create products/services for customers,

information supply chains are about the data used in their organization operations. Information supply chain data is A) being sourced from many places (or applications); B) being added to by supply chain processing (or other applications); and C) ultimately used by the organization to supply a product/service to customers.

But after the product/service is supplied the similarity between manufacturing and information supply chains breaks down. With the information supply chain, data is effectively indestructible, is infinitely re-useable and can live forever. Who throws data away anymore?

The problem most organizations have with information supply chains is once the product/service is supplied, data is often put away never to be seen again or as Scott puts it, goes dark.

This is where Hitachi Content intelligence (HCI) comes in. HCI is designed to take (unstructured or structured) data and analyze it (using natural language and other processing tools) to surround it with information and other metadata, so that it can become more visible and useful to the organization for the life of its existence.

Customers can also use HCI to extract and blend data streams together, automating the creation of an information rich, data repository. The data repository can readily be searched to re-discover or uncover attributes about the data not visible before.

Scott also mentioned the Hitachi Pentaho Platform which can be used to make real time decision from structured data. Pentaho information can also be fed into HCI to provide more intelligence for your structured data.

But HCI can also be used to analyze other database data as well. For instance, database blob and text elements can be fed to and analyzed by HCI. HCI analysis can include natural language processing and other functionality to tag the data by adding key:value information, all of which can be supplied back to the database or Pentaho to add further value to structured data.

Customers can also use HCI to read and transform database tables into XML files. XML files can be stored in object stores as objects or in file systems. XML data could easily be textually indexed and be searched by various tools to better understand the structured data information

We also talked about Hadoop data that can be offloaded to Hitachi Content Platform (HCP) object storage with a stub left behind. Once data is in HCP, HCI can be triggered to index and add more metadata, which can then later be used to decide when to move data back to Hadoop for further analysis.

Finally, Keith mentioned that he just got back from KubeCon and there was an increasing cry for data being used with containerized applications. Scott mentioned HCP for Cloud Scale, the newest member of the HCP object store family, focused on scale out capabilities to provide highly consistent, object storage performance for customers that need it. Customers running containerized workloads use scale-out capabilities to respond to user demand and now they have on premises object storage that can scale with them, as needs change.

The podcast ran ~24 minutes. Scott was very knowledgeable about data workflows, pipelines and the need for better discovery tools. We had a great time discussing information supply chains and how Hitachi can help customers optimize their data pipelines. Listen to the podcast to learn more.

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Scott Baker, Director of Content and Data Intelligence at Hitachi Vantara

Scott Baker is, and has been, an active member of the information technology, data analytics, data management, and data protection disciplines for longer than he is willing to admit.

In his present role at Hitachi, Scott is the Senior Director of the Content and Data Intelligence organization focused on Hitachi’s Digital Transformation, Data Management, Data Governance, Data Mobility, Data Protection and Data Analytics solutions which includes Hitachi Content Platform (HCP), HCP Anywhere, HCP Gateway, Hitachi Content Intelligence, and Hitachi Data Protection Solutions.

Scott is a VMware Certified Professional, recognized as a subject matter expert, industry speaker, and author. Scott has been a panelist on topics related to storage, cloud, information governance, data security, infrastructure standardization, and social media topics. His educational background includes an MBA, Master’s & Bachelor’s in Computer Science.

When he’s not working, Scott is an avid scuba diver, underwater photographer, and PADI Scuba Instructor. He has a passion for public speaking, whiteboarding, teaching, and traveling the world.

91: Keith and Ray show at CommvaultGO 2019

There was a lot of news at CommvaultGO this year and it was our first chance to talk with their new CEO, Sanjay Mirchandani. Just prior to the show Commvault introduced new SaaS backup offering for the mid market, Metallic™ and about a month or so prior to the show Commvault had acquired Hedvig, a software defined storage solution. Keith and I also participated in a TechFieldDay Exclusive (TFDx) for Commvault, the day before the show began.

First up is Metallic, a Commvault Venture. When Sanjay arrived he took a worldwide tour of Commvault offices and customers and came back saying they needed a Software-as-a-Service backup offering to go after the mid market. That was about 6 months ago and since then, they have spun up a development and marketing team and today delivered their first product.

Metallic has three offerings all based on Commvault technology but re-implemented to be simpler to use and operate in the cloud.

  1. Metallic Core Backup & Recovery which is targeted at virtualized server environments whether on premises or in the cloud. It covers backup and recovery for VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V & KVM VMs, SQL server and file servers running on Windows or Linux.
  2. Metallic Office 365 Backup & Recovery, which is targeted at Office 365 solutions and provides backup and recovery solutions for these customer environments.
  3. Metallic Endpoint Backup & Recovery, which is focused on desktop and laptop users and provides backup and recovery for those end-user environments.

Metallic operates in it’s own cloud environment (believed to be Microsoft Azure) and it’s a bring your own cloud secondary storage solution with an option to use Metallic cloud storage as secondary storage.

At the moment, Metallic is only offered to US based organizations and purchased through Commvault channel partners. However, the free (believe 45 day) trial can be downloaded and purchased without the channel.

Pricing for the Core Backup & Recovery is based on TB/month and pricing for the other two Metallic offerings is based on user seats/month. There doesn’t seem to be any retention limit for the Office365 and Endpoint products. The Core Backup product data retention is only limited by the TBs that are licensed.

Next up is Commvault Activate™. This product was announced at last years GO conference but neither Keith or I took note. Activate is data management solution using Commvault backup storage and provides three capabilities, File storage Optimization, which identifies files that are suitable for archive; Sensitive Data Governance, which profiles and id’s sensitive data in files and provides governance; and Compliance Search & eDiscovery, which can be used to put legal holds and create review sets for legal and other compliance activities.

And then there’s Hedvig, a Commvault Venture. At the show there was much talk about the Data Brain as having two sides, one was for the management of data protection and the other was for the management of storage. What Commvault plans to do over the next few years is to deliver on a unified storage and protection Data Brain that supports both of these sides. During the TFD sessions there was quite a lot of chatter, twitter and otherwise about whether customers would ever be willing to have both primary and secondary storage on the same system, or be have both be controlled by the same data plane. Commvault isn’t the only vendor to have gone down this path. We will need to wait and see how customers react.

The podcast is ~23 minutes. As mentioned previously, Keith is a long time friend and co-host of our GreyBeards On Storage podcast. He always has an interesting perspective on how new technology can benefit the data center today. Listen to the podcast to learn more.

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Keith Townsend, The CTO Advisor

Keith Townsend (@CTOAdvisor) is a IT thought leader who has written articles for many industry publications, interviewed many industry heavyweights, worked with Silicon Valley startups, and engineered cloud infrastructure for large government organizations.

Keith is the co-founder of The CTO Advisor, blogs at Virtualized Geek, and can be found on LinkedIN.