103: GreyBeards talk scale-out file and cloud data with Molly Presley & Ben Gitenstein, Qumulo

Sponsored by:

Ray has known Molly Presley (@Molly_J_Presley), Head of Global Product Marketing for just about a decade now and we both just met Ben Gitenstein (@Qumulo_Product), VP of Products & Solutions, Qumulo on this podcast. Both Molly and Ben were very knowledgeable about the problems customers have with massive data troves.

Molly has been on our podcast before (with another company, see: GreyBeards talk HPC storage with Molly Rector, CMO & EVP, DDN ). And we have talked with Qumulo before as well (see: GreyBeards talk data-aware, scale-out file systems with Peter Godman, Co-founder & CEO, Qumulo ).

Qumulo has a long history of dealing with customer issues with data center application access to data, usually large data repositories, with billions of small or large files, they have accumulated over time. But recently Qumulo has taken on similar problems in the cloud as well.

Qumulo’s secret has always been to allow researchers to run their applications wherever their data resides. This has led Qumulo’s software defined storage to offer multiple protocol access as well as a completely native, AWS and GCP cloud version of their solution.

That way customers can run Qumulo in their data center or in the cloud and have the same great access to data. Molly mentioned one customer that creates and gathers data using SMB protocol on prem and then, after replication, processes it in the cloud.

Qumulo Shift

Ben mentioned that many competitive storage systems are business model focused. That is they are all about keeping customer data within their solutions so they can charge for capacity. Although Qumulo also charges for capacity, with the new Qumulo Shift service, customer can easily move data off Qumulo and into native cloud storage. Using Shift, customers can free up Qumulo storage space (and cost) for any data that only needs to be accessed as objects.

With Shift, customers can replicate or move on prem or in the cloud Qumulo file data to AWS S3 objects. Once in S3, customers can access it with AWS native applications, other applications that make use of AWS S3 data, or can have that data be accessible around the world.

Qumulo customers can select directories to Shift to an AWS S3 bucket. The Qumulo directory name will be mapped to a S3 bucket name and each file in that directory will be copied to an S3 object in that bucket with the same file name.

At the moment, Qumulo Shift only supports AWS S3. Over time, Qumulo plans to offer support for other public cloud storage targets for Shift.

Shift is based on Qumulo replication services. Qumulo has a number of patents on replication technology that provides for sophisticated monitoring, control and high performance for moving vast amounts of data.

How customers use Shift

One large customer uses Qumulo cloud file services to process seismic data but then makes the results of that analysis available to other clients as S3 objects.

Customers can also take advantage of AWS and other applications that support objects only. For example, AWS SageMaker Machine Learning (ML) processes S3 object data. Qumulo customers could gather training data as files and Shift it to S3 objects for ML training.

Moreover, customers can use Shift to create AWS S3 object backups, archives and DR repositories of Qumulo file data. Ben mentioned DevOps could also use Qumulo Shift via APIs to move file data to S3 objects as part of new application deployment.

Finally, using Shift to copy or move file data to AWS S3, makes it ideal for collaboration by researchers, analysts and just about other entity that needs access to data.

The podcast ran ~26 minutes. Molly has always been easy to talk with and Ben turned out also to be easy to talk with and knew an awful lot about the product and how customers can use it. Keith and I enjoyed our time with Molly and Ben discussing Qumulo and their new Shift service. Listen to the podcast to learn more.

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Ben Gitenstein, VP of Products and Solutions, Qumulo

Ben Gitenstein runs Product at Qumulo. He and his team of product managers and data scientists have conducted nearly 1,000 interviews with storage users and analyzed millions of data points to understand customer needs and the direction of the storage market.

Prior to working at Qumulo, Ben spent five years at Microsoft, where he split his time between Corporate Strategy and Product Planning.

Molly Presley, Head of Global Product Marketing, Qumulo

Molly Presley joined Qumulo in 2018 and leads worldwide product marketing. Molly brings over 15 years of file system and archive technology leadership experience to the role.

Prior to Qumulo, Molly held executive product and marketing leadership roles at Quantum, DataDirect Networks (DDN) and Spectra Logic.

Presley also created the term “Active Archive”, founded the Active Archive Alliance and has served on the Board of the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA).

098: GreyBeards talk data protection & visualization for massive unstructured data repositories with Christian Smith, VP Product at Igneous

Sponsored By:

Even before COVID-19 there was a lot of file data being created and mined, but with the advent of the pandemic, this has accelerated considerably. As such, it seemed an appropriate time to talk with Christian Smith, VP of Product at Igneous, (@IgneousIO) a company that targets the protection and visibility of massive quantities of unstructured data, on premise, in the cloud, or just about anywhere else it may live.

Let me state at the outset, that my belief had always been, that you don’t backup 10PB of data, rather you bite the (big expense) bullet to replicate it and hope for the best. After talking with Christian and Igneous I am going to have to modify that belief by a couple of more orders of magnitude.

All this data is coming from: LIDAR, RADAR, audio, video, pictures, medical film, MRI/CAT Scans, etc., and as noted above, it’s exploding. Christian talked about one customer of theirs that supplies aerial photography/LIDAR/RADAR scans of areas on request. This can used to better understand crop, forest, wildlife, land health and use. One surprise Igneous found with this customer is that the data is typically archived after first use, but within a month or so it’s moved back online for some other purpose.

Igneous heritage

Many of the people who started up and currently work at Igneous have been around file storage for some time having, primarily coming from (Dell EMC) Isilon, NetApp, Qumulo and other industry heavyweights. When they started Igneous, they realized the world didn’t need another NAS box or file system. Rather, with the advent of 10-100PB unstructured data farms, what was needed was an effective way to protect and understand that data.

When they considered how to protect and visualize 100PB of unstructured data, the only they found to do this was to build a scale-out solution that used on premise and cloud infrastructure and was offered as a service.

Igneous DataProtect solution

With 10PB or 100PB of files, located across a gaggle of heterogeneous file servers, with billions of files across ~100s of servers, each of with has ~1K or more file shares, just scanning all the file servers would take weeks, if not longer and then you need to move the data someplace to protect it. Seems like an impossible task.

Igneous immediately figured out the first thing they needed was a radically new, scale out architecture to rapidly scan of the file servers. Thus was born ActiveScan. Christian said it was designed to scan a trillion files and they have customers with a billion files using their service today. ActiveScan doesn’t use NFS/SMB/Object (S3) access protocols to talk with file servers rather it uses internal APIs to access file metadata. DataProtect currently supports APIs for NetApp, Dell EMC Isilon, Pure FlashBlade, Qumulo, Gluster, Lustre, & GPFS (IBM Spectrum Scale) file systems. They use ActiveScan to build a file index database.

Their other major concern was hot to move PBs of data rapidly across to the cloud and other locations. Again they created a scale out, multi-threaded service to do this and also made use of internal APIs rather than standard file or object protocols. This became IntelliMove. That same customer above with billions of files, has 6PB of file data to protect.

Normal data movement is fine for largish, files but bogs down with lots of small files or extremely large files to back up. DataProtect gathers together small files into a large chunks and splits up extremely large files into smaller chunks and moves these chunks to secondary storage.

Data expiration is another problem, especially when you chunk files together. Here they came up with an intelligent garbage collection algorithm which only collects free space when it makes the most sense but deletes data access at the time of expiration.

DataProtect uses a cloud based, SaaS control plane that manages and coordinates its activities across data centers, sites and cloud instances. It also has a client VM (OVA, with 8 core CPU, 32GB DRAM, ~100MB) that runs in the customers infrastructure, on site, in CoLo’s or in the cloud that is used to scan-move-protect customer unstructured data. If more scan and data movement performance is needed, the VM can spawn additional threads automatically and more VMs can be added to provide even more throughput.

DataDiscover solution

The other service that Igneous offers is DataDiscover a data visualization tool. DataDiscover uses ActiveScan and its database to provide customers a way to understand the file data that resides in their massive unstructured data farms across the data center, cloud or wherever else it resides.

We didn’t discuss this solution as much but having a way to better understand the files in a 10-100PB unstructured data farm could be very useful and a great way to keep that 100PB from growing to 1EB faster than it has too.

As part of their outreach to the world, Igneous is giving away free DataProtect services to organizations that are focused on COVID-19 research. Check out their offer here

The podcast ran ~24 minutes. Christian was extremely knowledgeable about the problems that happen with very large unstructured data farms and how Igneous solutions can provide a better way to protect and visualize that data. Matt and I had a fun time discussing Igneous’s approach with Christian. Listen to the podcast to learn more.

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Christian Smith, VP Product at Igneous

Christian is VP of Product, responsible for product management, solutions, and customer success. Prior to Igneous, Christian spent 15 years running field engineering organizations at EMC, Isilon Systems, NetApp and Silicon Graphics.

Christian has been working with organizations that work with file data since working at Silicon Graphics. Before that Christian was co-founder of a small management consulting company associated with Y2K and deregulation.

Christian received dual bachelor’s degrees in Chemistry and Computer Science from the University of Missouri-Columbia. Christian is an avid camper, skier and traveler and has long since traveled through all of the continental 48 states.

097: GreyBeards talk open source S3 object store with AB Periasamy, CEO MinIO

Ray was at SFD19 a few weeks ago and the last session of the week (usually dead) was with MinIO and they just blew us away (see videos of MinIO’s session here). Ray thought Anand Babu (AB) Periasamy (@ABPeriasamy), CEO MinIO, who was the main presenter at the session, would be a great invite for our GreyBeards podcast. Keith and I had a ball talking with AB.

Why object store

There’s something afoot in object storage space over the last year or so. It seems everybody is looking to deploy object store whether that be on prem, in CoLo facilities and in the cloud. It could be just the mass of data coming online but that trend has remained the same for years no. No it’s something else.

It all starts with AWS and S3. Over the last couple of years AWS has been rolling out new functionality that only works with S3 and this has been driving even more adoption of S3 as well as other object storage solutions.

S3 compatible object stores are available in just about every cloud service, available from major (and minor) storage vendors and in open source from MinIO.

Why S3 is so popular

Because object store is accessed via RestFUL interfaces, traditionally most implementations used their own API to access it. But when AWS created S3 (simple storage service) with their own API/SDK to access it, it somehow became the de-facto standard interface for all other object stores. S3 compatibility became a significant feature that all object stores had to support.

Sometime after that MinIO came into existence. MinIO provides a 100% open source, fully AWS S3 compatible object store that you can run anywhere on prem, in CoLo facilities and indeed in the cloud. In fact, there exist customers that run MinIO in AWS AB says this is probably just customers using a packaged software solution which happens to include MinIO but it’s nonetheless more expensive than AWS S3 as it uses EC2 instances and EBS storage to create an object store

Customers can access MinIO object stores with the AWS S3 SDK or the MinIO SDK. and you can access AWS S3 storage with AWS S3 SDK or use MinIO SDK. Occosionally, AWS S3 updates have broken MinIO’s SDK but these have been later fixed by AWS. It seems AWS and MinIO are on good terms.

AB mentioned that as customers get up to a few PBs of AWS S3 storage they often find the costs to be too high. It’s at this point that they start looking at other object storage solutions. But because MinIO is 100% S3 compatible and it’s open source many of these customers deploy it in their own data center facilities or in colo environments.

For those customers that want it, MinIO also offers an S3 gateway. With the gateway on prem customers can use S3 or standard file services to access S3 object storage located in the cloud. The gateway also works in the public cloud and can support both AWS s3 as well as Microsoft Blob storage as a backend.

MinIO matches AWS S3 features

AWS S3 has a number of great features and MinIO has matched or exceeded them all, step by step. AWS S3 has cross region replication options where customers can replicate S3 data from one region to another. MinIO supports both asynchronous replication of S3 data and synchronous replication (using RADIO).

But MinIO adds support for erasure coding within a fault domain. Default is Nx2 erasure coding which duplicates all your data so as long as 1/2 of your servers and storage are available you continue to have access to all your data. But this can be configured down like 12+4 where data is split accross 16 servers any four of which can fail and you can still access data.

AWS customers can use a Snowball (standalone storage device) to transfer data to or from S3 storage. AWS Snowball implements a subset of S3 API and requires a NAS staging area of equivalent size to migrate data out of S3. MinIO has support for Snowball’s limited S3 API and as such, Snowball’s can be used to migrate data into or out of MinIO. MinIO has a blog post which describes their support for AWS Snowball.

AWS also offers S3 Lambda services or server less computing services where compute services can be invoked when data is loaded in a bucket and then turned off when no longer needed. AWS Lambda depends on AWS messaging and other services to work properly. But MinIO supports Lambda like functionality using other open source services. AB mentions MQTT and Kafka services. MinIO has another blog post discussing their Lambda like services based on Kafka.

AWS recently implemented Snowflake a SQL database server for unstructured data that uses S3 storage to hold data. Ray and Keith almost choked on that statement as unstructured data and databases never used to be uttered in the same breath. But what AWS has shown was that you can use object store for database data as long as you are willing to load the table into memory and process it there and then unload any modified table data back into the object store. Indexing of the object data seems to be done as the data is being loaded and is also being done in a (random IO) cache or in memory and once done can also be unloaded into the object store.

Now Snowflake uses S3 but it’s not available on prem. MinIO has a number of data base partners that make use of their object store as a backend to host a Snowflake like service onprem. AB mentioned Spark and Splunk but there are others as well.

We ended up the discussion with what does it mean to have 20K stars on GitHub. AB said if you did a java script getting 20K stars would be easy but you just don’t see this sort of open source popularity for storage systems. He said the number is interesting but the growth rate is even more interesting.

The podcast runs ~47 minutes. AB was a great to talk tech with. Keith and I could have talked all afternoon with AB. It was very hard to stop the recording as we could have talked with him for another hour or more. AB said he doesn’t like to do podcasts or videos but he had no problem with us firing away questions. Listen to the podcast to learn more.

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Anand Babu Periasamy, CEO MinIO

AB Periasamy is the CEO and co-founder of MinIO. One of the leading thinkers and technologists in the open source software movement, AB was a co-founder and CTO of GlusterFS which was acquired by RedHat in 2011. Following the acquisition, he served in the office of the CTO at RedHat prior to founding MinIO in late 2015. AB is an active angel investor and serves on the board of H2O.ai and the Free Software Foundation of India.

He earned his BE in Computer Science and Engineering from Annamalai University.

095: GreyBeards talk file sync&share with S. Azam Ali, VP Customer Success at CentreStack

We haven’t talked with a file synch and share vendor in a while now and Matt was interested in the technology. He had been talking with CentreStack, and found that they had been making some inroads in the enterprise. So we contacted S. Azam Ali, VP of Customer Success at CentreStack and asked if he wanted to talk about their product on our podcast.

File synch and share, is part collaboration tool, part productivity tool. With file synch & share many users share the same files, across many different environments and end point devices. It’s especially popular with road warriors that need access to the same files on the road that reside in corporate data centers. With this technology, files updated anywhere would be available to all.

Most file synch&share systems require you to use their storage. But CentreStack just provides synch and share access to NFS and SMB storage that’s already in the data center.

CentreStack doesn’t use VPNs to access data, many other vendor do. But with CentreStack, one just log’s into a website (with AD credentials) and they have immediate browser access to files.

CentreStack uses a gateway VM, that runs in the corporate data center, configured to share files/file directories/shares. We asked whether they were in the data path and Azam said no. However, the gateway does register for file system notifications (e.g. when files are updated, outside CentreStack, they get notified).

CentreStack does maintain meta-data on the files, directories, shares that are under it’s control. Presumably, once an admin sets it up, it goes out and access the file systems that have shared files and populates their meta-data for those files.

CentreStack works with any NFS and SMB file system as well as NAS servers that support these two. It’s unclear whether customers can have more than one gateway server in their data center supporting synch and share but Azam did say that it wasn’t unusual for customers with multi-data centers to have a gateway in each, to support synch&share requirements for each data center.

They use client software on end point devices, which presents the shared files as an external drive (to Mac), presumably a cloud drive for Windows PCs and similar services (in an App) for other systems (IOS, Android phones, iPad, etc.). We believe Azam said Linux was coming soon.

The client software can be configured in cache mode or offline mode:

  • Cache mode – the admin can configure how much space to use on the endpoint device and the software will cache the most recently used files in that space for faster access
  • Offline mode – the software moves all files that the endpoint login can access, to the device.

In cache mode, when users open a file (not in the most recently used cache), there will be some delay as the system retrieves data from the internet and copies it to the endpoint device. Unclear what the delay might be but it’s probably a function of internet speed and load on the gateway, with possibly some overhead for the NFS/SMB/NAS system to supply the data. If there’s not enough space to hold the file, the oldest non-open file is erased from the cache.

In both modes, Centrestack supports cross domain locking. That is, if one client has a file open (for update), all other systems/endpoints may only access the file in read-only mode. After the file is closed. the file can then be opened for update by other users.

When CentreStack clients are used to update files, the data is stored back in the original file systems with versioning. This way if the data is corrupted, admins can easily return back to a known good copy version.

CentreStack also offers a cloud backup and DR service. Gateway admins can request that synch&share files be backed up to cloud storage (AWS S3, Azure Blob and Wasabi). When CentreStack backups file data to the cloud, it also includes metadata information about the files so they can be re-constituted anywhere.

A CentreStack cloud gateway VM can be activated in the cloud to supply access to backed up files. Unclear whether the CentreStack cloud backup has to be restored to block or file storage first or if it just accesses the data on cloud storage directly. But one customers using CentreStack cloud DR would need to run client software in their applications accessing these files.

Wasabi seemed an odd solution to have on their list of supported cloud storage providers, but Azam said for their market, the economics of Wasabi storage were hard to ignore. See our previous podcast with David Friend, Co-Founder& CEO, Wasabi, to learn more about Wasabi.

CentreStack is licensed on a per user basis, not storage capacity bucking industry trends. But they don’t actually own the storage so it makes sense. For CentreStack cloud backup, customers also have to supply the cloud storage.

They also offer a 30 day free trial on their website with unlimited users. We assume this uses CentreStacks cloud gateway and customers bring their own cloud storage to support it.

The podcast runs about 35 minutes. Azam was a bit more marketing than we are used to, but he warmed up once we started asking questions. Listen to the podcast to learn more.

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S. Azam Ali, VP of Customer Success, CentreStack

S. Azam Ali, is VP of Customer Success at CentreStack and is an executive with extensive experience in managing global teams including sales, support and consulting services.

Azam’s channel experience includes on-boarding new partners including creation of marketing and training collateral for the partners. Azam is an executive with a passion for customer success and establishing long term relationships and partnerships.

Azam is also an advisor to startups as well as established technology companies.

92: Ray talks AI with Mike McNamara, Sr. Manager, AI Solution Mkt., NetApp

Sponsored By: NetApp

NetApp’s been working in the AI DL (deep learning) space for a long time now and announced their partnership with NVIDIA DGX systems, back in August of 2018. At NetApp Insight, this week they were showing off their new NVIDIA DGX systems reference architectures. These architectures use NetApp AFF A800 storage (for more info on AI DL, checkout Ray’s Learning Machine (deep) Learning posts – part 1, – part 2 and – part3).

Besides the ONTAP AI systems, NetApp also offers

  • FlexPod AI solution based on their partnership with Cisco using UCS C480 ML M5 rack servers which include 8 NVIDA Tesla V100 GPUs and also features NetApp AFF A800 storage for use in core AI DL.
  • NetApp HCI has two configurations with 2- or 3-NVIDIA GPUs that come in 1U or 2U rack servers and run VMware vSphere or RedHad OpenStack/OpenShift software hypervisors suitable for edge or core AI DL.
  • E-series reference architecture that uses the BeeGFS parallel file system and offers InfiniBAND data access for HPC or core AI DL.

On the conference floor, NetApp showed AI DL demos for automotive, financial services, Public Sector and healthcare verticals. They also had a facial recognition application running that could estimate your age and emotional state (I didn’t try it, but Mike said they were hedging the model so it predicted a lower age).

Mike said one healthcare solution was focused on radiological image scans, to identify pathologies from x-Ray, MRI, or CAT scan images. Mike mentioned there was a lot of radiological technologists burn-out due to the volume of work caused by the medical imaging explosion over the last decade or so. Mike said image analysis is something that h AI DL can perform very effectively and doing so would improve the accuracy and reduce the volume of work being done by technologists.

He also mentioned another healthcare application that uses an AI DL app to count TB cells in blood samples and estimate the extent of TB infections. Historically, this has been time consuming, error prone and hard to do in the field. The app uses a microscope with a smart phone and can be deployed and run anywhere in the world.

Mike mentioned a genomics AI DL application that examined DNA sequences and tried to determine its functionality. He also mentioned a retail AI DL facial recognition application that would help women “see” what they would look like with different makeup on.

There was a lot of discussion on NetApp Cloud services at the show, such as Cloud Volume Services and Azure NetApp File (ANF). Both of these could easily be used to implement an AI DL application or be part of an edge to core to cloud data flow for an AI DL application deployment using NetApp Data Fabric.

NetApp also announced a new, all flash StorageGRID appliance that was targeted at heavy IO intensive uses of object store like AI DL model training and data analytics.

Finally, Mike mentioned NetApp’s ecosystem of partners working in the AI space to help customers deploy AI DL algorithms in their industries. Some of these include:

  1. Flexential, Try and Buy AI so that customers could bring them in to supply AI DL expertise to generate an AI DL application using customer data and deploy it on customer cloud or on prem infrastructure .
  2. Core Scientific, AI-as-a-Service, so that customers could purchase a service to implement an AI DL application using customer data and running on Core Scientific infrastructure..
  3. Scale Matrix, Mobile data center AI, so that customers could create an AI DL application and run it on Scale Matrix infrastructure that was transported to wherever the customer wanted it to be run.

We recorded the podcast on the show floor, in a glass booth, so there’s some background noise (sorry about that, but can’t be helped). The podcast is ~27 minutes. Mike is a long time friend and NetApp product expert, recently working in AI DL solutions at NetApp. When I saw Mike at Insight, I just had to ask him about what NetApp’s been doing in the AI DL space. Listen to the podcast to learn more.

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Mike McNamara, Senior Manager AI Solution Marketing, NetApp

With over 25 years of data management product and solution marketing experience, Mike’s background includes roles of increasing responsibility at NetApp (10+ years), Adaptec, EMC and Digital Equipment Corporation. 

In addition to his past role as marketing chairperson for the Fibre Channel Industry Association, he was a member of the Ethernet Technology Summit Conference Advisory Board, a member of the Ethernet Alliance, and a regular contributor to industry journals, and a frequent speaker at events.