Springpath SDS springs forth

Springpath presented at SFD7 and has a new Software Defined Storage (SDS) that attempts to provide the richness of enterprise storage in a SDS solution running on commodity hardware. I would encourage you to watch the SFD7 video stream if you want to learn more about them.

HALO software

Their core storage architecture is called HALO which stands for Hardware Agnostic Log-structured Object store. We have discussed log-structured file systems before. They are essentially a sequential file that can be randomly accessed (read) but are sequentially written. Springpath HALO was written from scratch, operates in user space and unlike many SDS solutions, has no dependencies on Linux file systems.

HALO supports both data deduplication and compression to reduce storage footprint. The other unusual feature  is that they support both blade servers and standalone (rack) servers as storage/compute nodes.

Tiers of storage

Each storage node can optionally have SSDs as a persistent cache, holding write data and metadata log. Storage nodes can also hold disk drives used as a persistent final tier of storage. For blade servers, with limited drive slots, one can configure blades as part of a caching tier by using SSDs or PCIe Flash.

All data is written to the (replicated) caching tier before the host is signaled the operation is complete. Write data is destaged from the caching tier to capacity tier over time, as the caching tier fills up. Data reduction (compression/deduplication) is done at destage.

The caching tier also holds read cached data that is frequently read. The caching tier also has a non-persistent segment in server RAM.

Write data is distributed across caching nodes via a hashing mechanism which allocates portions of an address space across nodes. But during cache destage, the data can be independently spread and replicated across any capacity node, based on node free space available.  This is made possible by their file system meta-data information.

The capacity tier is split up into data and a meta-data partitions. Meta-data is also present in the caching tier. Data is deduplicated and compressed at destage, but when read back into cache it’s de-compressed only. Both capacity tier and caching tier nodes can have different capacities.

HALO has some specific optimizations for flash writing which includes always writing a full SSD/NAND page and using TRIM commands to free up flash pages that are no longer being used.

HALO SDS packaging under different Hypervisors

In Linux & OpenStack environments they run the whole storage stack in Docker containers primarily for image management/deployment, including rolling upgrade management.

In VMware and HyperVM, Springpath runs as a VM and uses direct path IO to access the storage. For VMware Springpath looks like an NFSv3 datastore with VAAI and VVOL support. In Hyper-V Springpath’s SDS is an SMB storage device.

For KVM its an NFS storage, for OpenStack one can use NFS or they have a CINDER plugin for volume support.

The nice thing about Springpath is you can build a cluster of storage nodes that consists of VMware, HyperV and bare metal Linux nodes that supports all of them. (Does this mean it’s multi protocol, supporting SMB for Hyper-V, NFSv3 for VMware?)

HALO internals

Springpath supports (mostly) file, block (via Cinder driver) and object access protocols. Backend caching and capacity tier all uses a log structured file structure internally to stripe data across all the capacity and caching nodes.  Data compression works very well with log structured file systems.

All customer data is supported internally as objects. HALO has a write-log which is spread across their caching tier and a capacity-log which is spread across the capacity tier.

Data is automatically re-balanced across nodes when new nodes are added or old nodes deleted from the cluster.

Data is protected via replication. The system uses a minimum of 3 SSD nodes and 3 drive (capacity) nodes but these can reside on the same servers to be fully operational. However, the replication factor can be configured to be less than 3 if you’re willing to live with the potential loss of data.

Their system supports both snapshots (2**64 times/object) and storage clones for test dev and backup requirements.

Springpath seems to have quite a lot of functionality for a SDS. Although, native FC & iSCSI support is lacking. For a file based, SDS for hypbervisors, it seems to have a lot of the bases covered.

Comments?

Other SFD7 blogger posts on Springpath:

Picture credit(s): Architectural layout (from SpringpathInc.com)