DataDirect Networks WOS cloud storage

DataDirect Networks (DDN) announced this week a new product offering private cloud services. Apparently the new Web Object Scaler (WOS) is a storage appliance that can be clustered together across multiple sites and offers a single global file name space across all the sites. Also the WOS cloud supports policy file replication and distribution across sites for redundancy and/or load ballancing purposes.

DDN’s press release said a WOS cloud can service up to 1 million random file reads per second. They did not indicate the number of nodes required to sustain this level of performance and they didn’t identify the protocol that was used to do this. The press release implied low-latency file access but didn’t define what they meant here. 1M file reads/sec doesn’t necessarily mean they are all read quickly. Also, there appears to b more work for a file write than a file read and there is no statement on file ingest rate provided.

There are many systems out there touting a global name space. However not many say thier global name space spans across multiple sites. I suppose cloud storage would need to support such a facility to keep file names straight across sites. Nonetheless, such name space services would imply more overhead during file creation/deletion to keep everything straight and meta data duplication/replication/redundancy to support this.

Many questions on how this all works together with NFS or CIFS but it’s entirely possible that WOS doesn’t support either file access protocol and just depends on HTML get and post to access files or similar web services. Moreover, assuming WOS supports NFS or CIFS protocols, I often wonder why these sorts of announcements aren’t paired with a SPECsfs(r) 2008 benchmark report which could validate any performance claim at least at the NFS or CIFS protocol levels.

I talked to one media person a couple of weeks ago and they said cloud storage is getting boring. There are a lot of projects (e.g., Atmos from EMC) out there targeting future cloud storage, I hope for their sake boring doesn’t mean no market exists for cloud storage.